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August 2018

GREENSVILLE/EMPORIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

LOCAL BOARD MEETING

The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services Administrative Board will meet on Thursday, October 18, 2017, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services located at 1748 East Atlantic Street.  The public is welcome to attend.

*** AMBER ALERT & CRITICALLY MISSING ADULT ALERT ***

*** AMBER ALERT & CRITICALLY MISSING ADULT ALERT ***

ADBUCTED COMAPANION SUSPECT
  • Age now: 12
  • Sex: Female
  • Hair: Black
  • Eyes: Brown
  • Height: 5'1"
  • Weight: 112 lbs
  • Description: Angie Carolina Rodriguez-Rubio, Hispanic, Female, brown hair, brown eyes, 12 years of age, 5 foot 1 inches tall, weighing 112 lbs wearing black blouse with flowers, black leggings and white sandals
  • Age now: 48
  • Sex: Female
  • Hair: Black
  • Eyes: Brown
  • Height: 5'4"
  • Weight: 140 lbs
  • Description: Elizabeth Rodriguez-Rubio, Hispanic, Female, black Hair, brown eyes, 48 years of age, 5 foot 4 inches tall, weighing 140lbs, last seen wearing a black skirt, burgundy blouse.
  •  
  • Sex: Male
  • Skin: White
  • Hair: Black
  • Height: 5'6"
  • Weight: 180 lbs
  • Description: Jamie Rodriguez-Sariol, White, male, black hair, brown eyes, 5 foot 6 inches, weighing 180 lbs.

 

 

  •  

An Amber Alert for Angie Caroline Rodriguez Rubio, 12, of Harrisonburg, Va., and a Critically Missing Adult Alert for her grandmother Elizabeth Rodriguez Rubio, 48, of Harrisonburg, Va., have been activated at the request of the Harrisonburg Police Department.

They were last seen at approximately 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 5, 2018 in the 2800 block of South Main Street in Harrisonburg, Va., with Hareton Jaime Rodriguez-Sariol, who is believed to have abducted them.  All three individuals were believed to be traveling in Sariol’s vehicle, which was involved in a vehicle fire on I-66 in Warren County.

Angie Caroline Rodriguez Rubio is a Hispanic female with long, curly, brown hair and brown eyes, height 5’1”, weighing 112 lbs. She was last seen wearing a black blouse with flowers, black leggings-style pants and white sandals.

Elizabeth Rodriguez Rubio is a Hispanic female with black hair and brown eyes, height 5’4”, weighing approximately 140 lbs. She was last seen wearing a burgundy blouse and a black skirt.

Rodriguez-Sariol is described as a Hispanic male, height 5’6”, weighing approximately 180 lbs., with short black hair and brown eyes. He has a known history of infatuation with Elizabeth Rodriguez Rubio. Rodriguez-Sariol was last seen at the 2 mile marker on I-66 where the vehicle fire occurred.  

Rodriguez-Sariol is believed to be traveling north toward New York in white 2000 Volvo tractor trailer, owned by AMG Express L.L.C., with Virginia license plate number 21739PZ.  

If you have information about Angie Carolina Rodriguez Rubio, Elizabeth Rodriguez Rubio or Hareton Jaime Rodriguez-Sariol, please call 911 or Harrisonburg Police Department at (540) 564-5050.

Ruby Gordon Jones

Ruby Gordon Jones, 83, of Skippers, passed away Thursday, August 30, 2018.  She was a life-long member of Forest Hill Baptist Church where she served in many roles and a retired Greensville County Public Schools employee.  Her family will always cherish the memories she leaves behind from the deep love she bestowed upon her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.  She was preceded in death by her late husband, Alamance Jones, Sr. and one brother, Gilbert Thomas Gordon, Sr. She is survived by her children, Alamance “Buck” Jones, Jr., Betty Lane Jones, June Luczynski and husband Mike, Cheryl Allen and husband Brian; Grandchildren, Sheree Wood and husband Lance, Michelle Jones, Faye Waller, Nicole Allen and fiancé Andrew Acree; Great-grandchildren, Jonathan Jones, Haley Jones, Jayshon Waller, Jermaine Jones, Hakeem Jones, Bradley Wood and KeMiyah Marley; One sister Alicia French; One brother, William A “Bill” Gordon; and special friends Mary Ann Fuller, Katie Ferguson, and Linda Paulson.  The family will receive friends 6:00-8 p.m. Saturday, September 1 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd., Jarratt, Virginia. The funeral service will be held 3p.m. Sunday, September 2 at Forest Hill Baptist Church and the interment will follow in the church cemetery.  Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

Helen Mowbray Good Tusing

Helen Marie Mowbray Good Tusing, 87, of Elkton, died peacefully, Thursday, August 30, 2018, at her home.

She was born June 1, 1931, in McGaheysville, VA, and was the daughter of the late Jesse Lee and Isla May Magalis Mowbray.

Helen worked at Shenandoah Manufacturing for 15 years before retiring in 1989 due to health issues.  She enjoyed gardening, bird watching, photography, and family time.  In 2010 she wrote a story about her family which was published in the book, “The Good Ole Days”.

She is survived by her husband of 30 years, Dale William Tusing, whom she married May 7, 1988; two daughters, Donna Good Hayslett (Neil) of Linville and Lisa Good Junkins (Jim) of Broadway; grandchildren Heather Boyer Curry (Earl) of Harrisonburg, Elyse Campise of Michigan, Lena Campise of New Jersey, Kyle McDorman of Harrisonburg, Erek Mowbray of Elkton, Ryan Hensley of Elkton, Laura Hayslett Montanez (Josh) of Linville, Megan Hensley of Elkton, and Adam Hayslett (Sydney) of Lebanon, Tennessee; 12 great-grandchildren and a great-granddaughter due January 2019.

Helen leaves behind five siblings, Kathleen “Kitty” Propst (Charles) of Weyers Cave, Joyce Carol Morris (Robert) of Grottoes, Leon Mowbray of Mt. Crawford, Nelson Mowbray (Brenda) of Harrisonburg, and Faye Lauria of Florida; father-in-law Reuel Tusing of Broadway; numerous nieces and nephews, and sisters-in-law, Marguerite Good Mangum of Jarratt, VA. and Patricia Hawkins (Lewis) of Harrisonburg.  She also leaves behind her rotund orange tabby cat, Mustang 5.0.

She was preceded in death by her first husband, Ray Compton Good, on April 29, 1985 and a daughter, Yvonne Rose Good Williams, on March 11, 1991.

Pastor Margaret Michael along with Nathanael Kelley will conduct the funeral service on Sunday, September 2, at 3:00 p.m. at Kyger Funeral Home, Elkton, with visitation from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. prior to the service.  Interment will be at Mill Creek Church Cemetery in Port Republic following the service.

Helen loved roses and invites attendees to bring a single rose of any color to be placed in vases.

The family would like to extend their appreciation to Sentara Hospice and to the following who assisted in her care:  Ryan and Megan Hensley, Carolyn Lewis, Lynne Rhodes, Laura Spitler, Linda Swecker, and Penny Wilhelm.

Condolences may be shared at www.kygers.com.

WITH FATALITIES DOWN IN VIRGINIA, STATE POLICE URGES MOTORISTS TO BUCKLE UP, #DRIVE2SAVELIVES, AND HELP PREVENT TRAFFIC DEATHS THIS LABOR DAY WEEKEND

RICHMOND – Seven lives have been lost in the past seven days as a result of traffic crashes on Virginia highways. Sadly, four of the six individuals killed in passenger vehicle crashes during that week were unrestrained.

Despite a nine percent decrease in total traffic fatalities during the first eight months of 2018 compared to the same period in 2017, fatalities involving unrestrained drivers or passengers are on pace with last year, according to preliminary data. Of the 493 total people killed to date in 2018, 220 of them weren’t wearing a seat belt. More than a quarter (58) of those unbelted fatalities were individuals age 21-30.

“It takes just three seconds to buckle up, and the choice you make could be the difference between a life saved and another tragic statistic,” said Colonel Gary T. Settle, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “We need your help to prevent fatalities on our roads and continue driving these alarming fatality numbers down. As you travel for the Labor Day holiday, whether it’s across the state or around the corner, buckle up every ride, every time.”

Occupant restraint enforcement is a key component of the Labor Day Operation C.A.R.E. (Crash Awareness and Reduction Effort) traffic safety initiative that begins 12:01 a.m. Friday, Aug. 31, 2018, and concludes Monday, Sept. 3, 2018, at midnight. Virginia State Police will increase patrols to ensure the long holiday weekend is as safe as possible.

The state-sponsored, national program encourages law enforcement agencies to increase visibility and traffic enforcement efforts on major travel holidays, like Labor Day. The program also means that all available Virginia State Police troopers will be on patrol through the holiday weekend.

The 2017 Labor Day Operation C.A.R.E. initiative resulted in troopers citing 576 individuals who failed to obey the law and buckle up, as well as issuing 181 citations for child safety seat violations on Virginia’s highways statewide. In addition, state police cited 7,447 speeders and 2,092 reckless drivers. A total of 97 drunken drivers were taken off Virginia’s roadways and arrested by state troopers.

There were five traffic fatalities statewide during the four-day statistical counting period (Sept. 1, 2017 – Sept. 4, 2017) of the 2017 Labor Day weekend. None of those individuals were wearing seat belts.

In 2016, there were eight traffic deaths, and in 2015, Virginia experienced 16 fatalities on Virginia’s highways during the holiday weekend.*

With increased patrols, Virginia State Police also reminds drivers of Virginia’s “Move Over” law, which requires motorists to move over when approaching an emergency vehicle stopped alongside the road. If unable to move over, drivers are required to cautiously pass the emergency vehicle. The law also applies to workers in vehicles equipped with amber lights.

From 2008 to 2017 nationwide, 126 law enforcement officers working along the roadside were struck by a vehicle and killed because a driver failed to heed the “Move Over” law.**

*Source: Virginia Highway Safety Office, Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles

**Source: National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund

USDA Announces Details of Assistance for Farmers Impacted by Unjustified Retaliation

(Washington, D.C., August 27, 2018)– U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced details of actions the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will take to assist farmers in response to trade damage from unjustified retaliation by foreign nations. President Donald J. Trump directed Secretary Perdue to craft a short-term relief strategy to protect agricultural producers while the Administration works on free, fair, and reciprocal trade deals to open more markets in the long run to help American farmers compete globally. As announced last month, USDA will authorize up to $12 billion in programs, consistent with our World Trade Organization obligations.

“Early on, the President instructed me, as Secretary of Agriculture, to make sure our farmers did not bear the brunt of unfair retaliatory tariffs. After careful analysis by our team at USDA, we have formulated our strategy to mitigate the trade damages sustained by our farmers. Our farmers work hard, and are the most productive in the world, and we aim to protect them,” said Secretary Perdue.

These programs will assist agricultural producers to meet the costs of disrupted markets:

  • USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) will administer the Market Facilitation Program (MFP) to provide payments to corn, cotton, dairy, hog, sorghum, soybean, and wheat producers starting September 4, 2018. An announcement about further payments will be made in the coming months, if warranted.
  • USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) will administer a Food Purchase and Distribution Program to purchase up to $1.2 billion in commodities unfairly targeted by unjustified retaliation. USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) will distribute these commodities through nutrition assistance programs such as The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) and child nutrition programs.
  • Through the Foreign Agricultural Service’s (FAS) Agricultural Trade Promotion Program (ATP), $200 million will be made available to develop foreign markets for U.S. agricultural products. The program will help U.S. agricultural exporters identify and access new markets and help mitigate the adverse effects of other countries’ restrictions.

“President Trump has been standing up to China and other nations, sending the clear message that the United States will no longer tolerate their unfair trade practices, which include non-tariff trade barriers and the theft of intellectual property. In short, the President has taken action to benefit all sectors of the American economy – including agriculture – in the long run,” said Secretary Perdue. “It’s important to note all of this could go away tomorrow, if China and the other nations simply correct their behavior. But in the meantime, the programs we are announcing today buys time for the President to strike long-lasting trade deals to benefit our entire economy.”

To watch a video message from Secretary Perdue regarding today’s announcement, you may view Secretary Perdue‘s Overview of Trade Mitigation Package.

Background on Market Facilitation Program:

MFP is established under the statutory authority of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) and administered by FSA. For each commodity covered, the payment rate will be dependent upon the severity of the trade disruption and the period of adjustment to new trade patterns, based on each producer’s actual production.

Interested producers can apply after harvest is 100 percent complete and they can report their total 2018 production. Beginning September 4th of this year, MFP applications will be available online at www.farmers.gov/mfp. Producers will also be able to submit their MFP applications in person, by email, fax, or by mail.

Eligible applicants must have an ownership interest in the commodity, be actively engaged in farming, and have an average adjusted gross income (AGI) for tax years 2014, 2015, and 2016 of less than $900,000. Applicants must also comply with the provisions of the “Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation” regulations. On September 4, 2018, the first MFP payment periods will begin. The second payment period, if warranted, will be determined by the USDA.

Market Facilitation Program

Commodity

Initial Payment Rate

Est. Initial Payment**

(in $1,000s)

Cotton

$0.06 / lb.

$276,900

Corn

$0.01 / bu.

$96,000

Dairy (milk)

$0.12 / cwt.

$127,400

Pork (hogs)

$8.00 / head

$290,300

Soybeans

$1.65 / bu.

$3,629,700

Sorghum

$0.86 / bu.

$156,800

Wheat

$0.14 / bu.

$119,200

Total

 

$4,696,300

** Initial payment rate on 50% of production

The initial MFP payment will be calculated by multiplying 50 percent of the producer’s total 2018 actual production by the applicable MFP rate. If CCC announces a second MFP payment period, the remaining 50 percent of the producer’s total 2018 actual production will be subject to the second MFP payment rate.

MFP payments are capped per person or legal entity at a combined $125,000 for dairy production or hogs. Payment for dairy production is based off the historical production reported for the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy). For existing dairy operations, the production history is established using the highest annual milk production marketed during the full calendar years of 2011, 2012, and 2013. Dairy operations are also required to have been in operation on June 1, 2018 to be eligible for payments. Payment for hog operations will be based off the total number of head of live hogs owned on August 1, 2018.

MFP payments are also capped per person or legal entity at a combined $125,000 for corn, cotton, sorghum, soybeans and wheat.

For more information on the MFP, visit www.farmers.gov/mfpor contact your local FSA office, which can be found at www.farmers.gov.

Background on Food Purchase and Distribution Program:

The amounts of commodities to be purchased are based on an economic analysis of the damage caused by unjustified tariffs imposed on the crops listed below. Their damages will be adjusted based on several factors and spread over several months in response to orders placed by states participating in the FNS nutrition assistance programs.

Food Purchases

Commodity

Target Amount (in $1,000s)

Apples

$93,400

Apricots

$200

Beef

$14,800

Blueberries

$1,700

Cranberries

$32,800

Dairy

$84,900

Figs

$15

Grapefruit

$700

Grapes

$48,200

Hazelnuts

$2,100

Kidney Beans

$14,200

Lemons/Limes

$3,400

Lentils

$1,800

Macadamia

$7,700

Navy Beans

$18,000

Oranges (Fresh)

$55,600

Orange Juice

$24,000

Peanut Butter

$12,300

Pears

$1,400

Peas

$11,800

Pecans

$16,000

Pistachios

$85,200

Plums/Prunes

$18,700

Pork

$558,800

Potatoes

$44,500

Rice

$48,100

Strawberries

$1,500

Sweet Corn

$2,400

Walnuts

$34,600

Total

$1,238,800

Program details yet to be determined

Commodity

Target Amount (in $1,000s)

Almonds

$63,300

Sweet Cherries

$111,500

Total

$174,800

Products purchased will be distributed by FNS to participating states, for use in TEFAP and other USDA nutrition assistance programs.

Purchasing:

AMS will buy affected products in four phases. The materials purchased can be adjusted between phases to accommodate changes due to: growing conditions; product availability; market conditions; trade negotiation status; and program capacity.

AMS will purchase known commodities first. By purchasing in phases, procurements for commodities that have been sourced in the past can be purchased more quickly and included in the first phase.

Vendor Outreach:

To expand the AMS vendor pool and the ability to purchase new and existing products, AMS will ramp up its vendor outreach and registration efforts. AMS has also developed flyers on how the process works and how to become a vendor for distribution to industry groups and interested parties. Additionally, AMS will continue to host a series of free webinars describing the steps required to become a vendor. Stakeholders will have the opportunity to submit questions to be answered during the webinar. Recorded webinars are available to review by potential vendors, and staff will host periodic Question and Answer teleconferences to better explain the process.

Product Specifications:

AMS maintains purchase specifications for a variety of commodities, which ensure recipients receive the high-quality product they expect. AMS in collaboration with FNS regularly develops and revises specifications for new and enhanced products based on program requirements and requests and will be prioritizing the development of those products impacted by unjustified retaliation. AMS will also work with industry groups to identify varieties and grades sold to China and other offshore markets such as premium apples, oranges, pears and other products. AMS will develop or revise specifications to facilitate the purchase of these premium varieties in forms that meet the needs of FNS nutrition assistance programs.

Outlets:

AMS purchases commodities for use in FNS programs such as the National School Lunch Program, TEFAP and other nutrition assistance programs. AMS is working closely with FNS to distribute products to State Agencies that participate in USDA nutrition assistance programs as well as exploring other outlets for distribution of products, as needed.

To the extent possible, FNS will identify items for distribution that are appropriate for each potential outlet. The products discussed in this plan will be distributed to States for use in the network of food banks and food pantries that participate in TEFAP, elderly feeding programs such the Commodity Supplemental Foods Program, and tribes that operate the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations.

These outlets are in addition to child nutrition programs such as the National School Lunch Program, which may also benefit from these purchases.

Distribution:

AMS has coordinated with the Office of the Chief Economist, FNS, Industry, and other agency partners to determine necessary logistics for the purchase and distribution of each commodity including trucking, inspection and audit requirements, and agency staffing.

Background on Agricultural Trade Promotion Program:

The FAS will administer the ATP under authorities of the CCC. The ATP will provide cost-share assistance to eligible U.S. organizations for activities such as consumer advertising, public relations, point-of-sale demonstrations, participation in trade fairs and exhibits, market research, and technical assistance. Applications for the ATP will be accepted until November 2, 2018 or until funding is exhausted. Funding should be allocated to eligible participants in early 2019. The ATP is meant to help all sectors of U.S. agriculture, including fish and forest product producers, mainly through partnerships with non-profit national and regional organizations.

Agricultural Trade Promotion Program

 

Est. Amount (in $1,000s)

Ag Products Total

$200,000

AUTHORS’ NIGHT AT BRUNSWICK COUNTY LIBRARY - Part Two

The Brunswick County Library will host Authors’ Night 2018 on Monday, September 17, from 5:30-7:30 PM. Seven Virginia authors will be on hand to talk about their work and to autograph copies of their books. Authors attending this year’s event will include:  Valerie Burke, Lisa Clary, Catina Macklin, Joey and Vicky Powell, Teresa Stith, and Ronald Thornhill.

Valerie Burke, a Suffolk native, is the author of A Good Apple, a children’s book that teaches foundational life learning skills including educational concepts, biblical values, character development, and important social skills. The book features subjects such as the alphabet, numbers, and colors, and also features Bible verses and moral teachings.

Lisa E. Clary was born Brunswick County and lives in South Hill, VA. She is the author of Lisa’s Lines From Under The Hat, an accumulation of poetry and prose that she has written over the years. Lisa has spent most of her life working in the media field, and currently works for the Mecklenburg Sun as an account executive, reporter, and photographer. She has also been a part of many organizations in South Hill, including the Rotary Club, the Lions Club, and the Chamber of Commerce.

Catina Macklin is a native of Brunswick County and author of The Call, The Answer, The Experience. Her book offers reflections on her life experiences and outlook on finding true success. She has been working in the counseling field for over 11 years and is currently a Dialogue Practitioner and Interventionist, providing coaching and facilitating training to those who are in leadership and treatment roles.

Look in next week for profiles of authors, Joey and Vicky Powell, Teresa Stith, and Dr. Ronald Thornhill.

Plan to attend Authors’ Night 2018 at the Brunswick County Library on Monday, September 17th.  During this special event, table space and seating for the public may be limited. Refreshments will be served. The Brunswick County Library is part of the Meherrin Regional Library System. For more information please call the library at 434-848-2418 or visit www.meherrinlib.org.

Milton Eugene Allen

Milton Eugene Allen, of Emporia, born July 30, 1935 in Greensville County to the late Floyd Allen and Anna Newsome Allen, passed away on August 27, 2018, leaving behind his loving wife of 62 years, Martha Moore Allen.

In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by a brother, David Carlton Allen.

Eugene graduated from Greensville County High School in 1955 and served in the Virginia National Guard from 1958 until 1964. He was employed at the American Box Company as Plant Manager before retiring from Toll Brothers in 2002 as a supervisor. Eugene was a longtime member of Main Street Baptist Church where he served in many leadership positions and sang in the choir.

In addition to his wife, Eugene is survived by a son; Milton Eugene “Mickey” Allen Jr. and his wife Pamela Newsome Allen, grandchildren; Kevin Blake Allen and wife Loren Taylor Allen of Jarratt, , Nicholas Eugene Allen and special friend Courtney Lewis of Brodnax, , Katelyn Malone of Richmond, Stephen Malone and wife Heather of Okinawa, Japan , and Crystal Carpenter of Emporia; great grandchildren , Bryson Blake Allen and Macy Rain Allen of Jarratt Va.; sisters-in-law, Peggy Blankenship of Emporia and Helen Rose and Shirley Lamm, both of Richmond;  a special nephew Ted Rose and wife Melinda of Harrisonburg and two special nieces Ginger L. Hawthorne of Richmond and Candy L. Harrison and husband Billy of Chesapeake.

Memorial Services will be held Thursday, August 30, 2018 at 2:00 P.M. in the Echols Funeral Home Chapel with Dr. Rick Hurst officiating. The family will receive friends at the funeral home at 1:00 P.M. until service time.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Main Street Baptist Church Youth Group Fund, 310 N. Main St. Emporia, Va. 23847.

Online condolences may be left at echolsfuneralhome.com.

“Noël!” Christmas Is Coming!

Announcing the news that the Southside Virginia Community College (SVCC) Chorus will begin its fall rehearsals on Sunday, September 9, 2018 6:00-8:00PM at South Hill Presbyterian Church, 914 Mecklenburg Ave., South Hill, VA  23970. The SVCC Chorus concert will be held on Sunday, December 9th in South Hill and will also include another venue to be announced.

The music for this season is inspired by French Christmas carols using Noëls and Glorias of the angels. The Star lights the night sky for the Three Wise Men as they seek the way to the stable. Lighter holiday music is also included: such as, “Winter Wonderland” and “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” with other favorites. Instrumentalists will include cello, violin and flute. Other soloists and a variety of settings with instruments and voices will complete a delightful program. Carol Henderson is the director and Sally Tharrington is the pianist.

The SVCC Chorus appreciates the support of both the SVCC College and the SVCC College Foundation which allows this chorus to continue sharing music with the community. Most recently in April 2018, the SVCC Chorus presented two (2) exceptional concerts in South Hill and Clarksville, featuring a string quartet, string bass, flute, commissioned music and a visit from stringed instrument maker, Paul Becker of Chicago.

This musical variety of choral music provided by the SVCC Chorus is a welcome addition for the community in Southern Virginia. Comments from attendees in April 2018:

“ [I appreciate the] “diligence…to bring such a professional concert to our community,”

“the angelic voices of the ladies chorus accompanied by the strings created a sacred moment for me.”

“ [The SVCC Chorus is] truly bringing culture to Southside Virginia”.

“highlight [of the concert for me] was the variety of smaller groups…Sally playing…females singing…strings performing alone, solos, etc.”

Perhaps you would like learn some new holiday music and sing Noels and Christmas Glorias with the fine voices of the SVCC Chorus! The SVCC Chorus will begin its fall rehearsals on Sunday, September 9th at 6:00 PM at the South Hill Presbyterian Church. Registration is $20.00 payable to SVCC. For more info please contact: carol.henderson60@gmail.com.

“Noël!” Christmas Is Coming!

Southside Virginia Community College (SVCC) Chorus

Rehearsals Begin: Sunday, September 9th at 6:00

South Hill Presbyterian Church
914 N. Mecklenburg Ave
South Hill, VA  23970

Registration Fee due at your first Rehearsal: $20.00

No Auditions

All music included!

For more Info Contact: carol.henderson60@gmail.com or louise.ogburn@southside.edu

Theodore George Brna

Theodore George Brna, 85, of Cary NC departed this world on Monday, August 20, 2018. He was born in Emporia, Va on March 14, 1933. He graduated from Emporia High School as a multi-sport letter athlete. He then served his country as a veteran of the Korean Warand completed over 30 years in the service of his country in the US ArmyReserve before retiring with a rank of colonel. He obtained his undergraduate and masters degrees in mechanical engineering at Virginia Tech where he also taught mechanical and environmental engineering following completion of his doctorate from NC State University. In 1976, he relocated to Cary and joined the inaugural Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an environmental engineer. His EPA career included extensive domestic and international consultation activities in the control and recovery technology field. Professionally, he was also very involved with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), serving as regional vice president before his retirement in 2004. Ted was also a dedicated leader at Our Savior Lutheran Church, in Raleigh where he continued to serve in many capacities after his retirement. A loving and devoted father and grandfather, he will be most sorely missed at his grandchildrens' sporting events, the NC State Fair and Christmas Eve gatherings. He is survived by his 4 children, Theodore George (Jr) of Bailey; Brenda of Loveland, CO; Ronald Paul of Youngsville; and Thomas Eric of Raleigh; 9 grandchildren Stephanie, Merri, Andrew, James Matthew, Kaitlyn, Jennifer, Roxann, Madison, and Elli; and a sister, Ellen Dillard of Richmond,VA. Funeral service will be held at Our Savior Lutheran Church in Raleigh on September 1 at 11 AM with reception. This will be followed by a graveside commitment service at the St. John's Lutheran Church cemetery in Emporia, VA at 3 PM. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Our Savior Lutheran Church, Raleigh, and St John's Lutheran Church, Emporia, Va.

"The Nature Walk"

I looked down from the hilltop
to the valley far below
just to watch the bubbling water
of the stream which did there flow.
 
Now I couldn't see the fish or turtles
though I knew that they were there
yet when you're enjoying nature
you don't need to sicht to care.
 
Yes I am a true nature lover
and do enjoy whate're I see
a walk through the fields and forest
can give a piece of mind to me.
 
A nature walk can do wonders
clense stressful thoughts from mind
yes and the aderenaline keeps flowing
from not knowing what you'll see.
 
One does not have to hurry
it's better to take time and enjoy
now this info is from experience
of when yet a little boy.
 
Now just put it in your schedule
take the time for to explore
I assure you if you once attempt
your want will be for more.
 
                    Roy E. Schepp

ATTORNEY GENERAL HERRING WINS PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION BLOCKING 3D-PRINTED GUNS

~ AG Herring joined a coalition of state attorneys general asking the Courts to block the Trump Administration’s dangerous plan back in July ~

RICHMOND (August 27, 2018) – Today, Attorney General Mark R. Herring won a preliminary injunction blocking the Trump Administration’s dangerous plan to make 3D-printed guns more widely available. The preliminary injunction follows a lawsuit that was filed by Attorney General Herring and a coalition of state attorneys general back in July, seeking an injunction to prevent the distribution of detailed plans for printing plastic guns using 3D printers.

“The Trump Administration's reckless plan to make 3D-printed guns widely available and easily accessible was one of the most dangerous ideas I have ever heard,” said Attorney General Herring. “As a country, we need to focus on keeping our communities safer, not making it easier for dangerous individuals or criminals to get their hands on home-printed, untraceable, and undetectable guns. This preliminary injunction is an important first step in keeping 3D-printed guns off of our streets and I will continue to work with my colleagues to put a stop to the Trump Administration’s dangerous plan once and for all.”

3D-printed guns could be undetectable by metal detectors, untraceable because of a lack of a serial number, and sought out by criminals and domestic abusers who cannot legally possess a firearm or pass a background check. The company that wants to distribute the plans online does not require proof of age or proof of eligibility before allowing a customer to download the plans.

Attorney General Herring previously joined a bipartisan coalition of 21 attorneys general in a letter to Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo objecting to the Trump administration’s plan to allow the print-at-home gun plans to be made available online.

In the letter, Attorney General Herring and his colleagues argue that publicly available information on 3-D printed weapons will enable the production of firearms that are untraceable and undetectable by magnetometers in places such as airports, government buildings and schools. Additionally, unrestricted access to this kind of information will increase illegal trafficking of weapons across state and national borders.

The posting of the print-at-home gun plans was set in motion by a recent settlement between the Trump administration and Defense Distributed, a Texas-based online company that was previously ordered by the U.S. Department of State to remove downloadable files for firearms from its website.

Dental Health Why a healthy mouth is good for your body

Community Out-Reach Education

South Hill – Good oral health has a positive impact on your general health and timely dental care can help you keep your teeth longer.  Bad oral bacteria that cause tooth and gum disease can travel to other parts of your body, contributing to chronic diseases like high blood pressure and diabetes. How can natural aging affect my teeth?  Is there a link between gum disease and heart disease?  Which dental treatment options will work best for me?

If you are seeking answers to questions like these you should attend September’s C.O.R.E. (Community Out-Reach Education) Program at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital to learn more about dental health.

This FREE program will be on Tuesday, September 18th at 4:00 p.m. in the VCU Health CMH Education Center inside the new C.A.R.E. Building located at 1755 N. Mecklenburg Avenue in South Hill.

Dr. Natasha Grover will be the speaker for the program.  Dr. Grover is a graduate of the VCU School of Dentistry in Richmond, VA. She is licensed with the Virginia Board of Dentistry and is a member of the American Dental Association and The Royal College of Surgeons in England.  Dr. Grover’s scope of practice includes general dentistry for children and adults, with special interest and continuing education in pediatric and adult restorative dentistry as well as root canals, crowns, bridges and dental extractions.  She will practice in the new CMH Family Dental Clinic that will be located in the C.A.R.E. Building at 1755 N. Mecklenburg Avenue in South Hill, VA. The new dental clinic is planned to open in November, 2018.

Reservations are not required for this program; however, they are recommended.  For more information or to register to attend, please call (434) 774-2550 or visitwww.vcu-cmh.org.

Nurse Extern Program at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital

Jenna Lindner, RN Mentor, Heather Hill, Nurse Extern, Kassie Felts, Nurse Extern, April Hayes, Nurse Extern, Ashley Willis, RN, Nurse Mentor (Nurse Externs not pictured: Keri Lenhart, Jamie McGhee, Allison Meyer)

Submitted by Hazel Willis, RN, BSN

Six Registered Nursing Students participated in the Nurse Extern Program offered by VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital this summer. The Nurse Extern Program at VCU Health CMH is designed to give Registered Nursing students that will graduate next year the opportunity to work side-by-side under the supervision of a Registered Nurse Mentor. It is a ten-week program that allows them to rotate to different nursing units of their choice. The students get hands-on experience while working with registered nurses.  The program expands their knowledge and helps to prepare them for their senior year of nursing school and the role of a Registered Nurse in the workforce. 

The Nurse Externs described their experiences as wonderful and a great learning adventure. They stated, “We really felt like we were a part of the VCU Health CMH health care team. It boasted my confidence tremendously and it was an awesome experience to have the opportunity to apply what I have learned in school.” The Nurse Externs had many nursing stories to share and reiterated that they were glad they had taken the time this summer to participate. They completed the program stating they would strongly recommend it to other registered nursing students.

This was the fourteenth year that VCU Health CMH has offered the program. We are pleased that we can offer this opportunity to registered nursing students,” states Hazel Willis, RN, BSN, VCU Health CMH Nurse Extern Coordinator. It has been a positive recruitment tool to attract nurses to VCU Health CMH upon graduation. The nurses that attended the program previously and joined the VCU Health CMH Nursing team after graduation described the transition from nursing student to Registered Nurse as already feeling as if they were a part of the dynamic health care team at VCU Health CMH. We encourage other nursing students to take advantage of the program next summer to better prepare themselves for the workforce and their senior year of the Registered Nursing Program.

Emma Jean Allen Moss

Emma Jean Allen Moss, 79, of Skippers, went home to be with the Lord on Friday, August 24, 2018. A faithful member of Zion Baptist Church, she retired from Greensville County Sheriff’s Department/Southside Regional Jail.

Mrs. Moss was preceded in death by her parents, Luther and Mary Allen; her husband, Rudolph Moss; sisters, Bessie Richardson and Virginia Goodfellow and brother, Robert Allen.

She is survived by a son, Wayne Moss (Jean); daughters, B J Sasser (Hunter) and Amy Sopko (Paul);  six grandchildren, Cassey Taylor (Richard), Brandy Huskey (Jim), Eric Moss (Heather), Brent Moss (Crystal), Amanda Sopko (Mike) and Tara Moss; nine great-grandchildren, Blade, Logan, Ciara, Alexis, Bryson, Briar, Serenity, Harley and Noah and a sister, Shirley Doyle (William Neal).

The funeral service will be held 3 p.m. Tuesday, August 28 at Zion Baptist Church in Skippers with interment to follow in the church cemetery. The family will receive friends at church one hour prior to the service.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to Crater Community Hospice, 3916 S. Crater Rd, Petersburg, Virginia 23805.

Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com

Small Ruminant Health Will Be the Focus of Annual Small Ruminant Field Day

Goat and sheep health is the theme of this year’s Small Ruminant Field Day, which will be held on Friday, September 21, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at Virginia State University’s Randolph Farm, 4415 River Road, Ettrick. 

“We hope participants will take away the message that having good healthcare management will result in high-performing animals,” said Dr. Dahlia O’Brien, small ruminant Extension specialist.“They will understand how to identify common health issues, treatments and steps to take in preventing health problems and when to contact their veterinarian.” 

Dr. Niki Whitley, an animal science Extension specialist at Fort Valley State University in Georgia, is this year’s keynote speaker. Dr. Whitley has worked with goats and sheep for 20 years at the University of Missouri, the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and North Carolina A&T State University. She earned herPh.D. in animal physiology from Mississippi State University. 

VSU agricultural researchers will also present during the field day. Dr. Michelle Corley will discuss using stinging nettle for deworming and Dr. Eunice Ndegwa will discuss maintaining gut health in pre-weaned kids and lambs. Dr. O’Brien and Amanda Miller, VSU’s herd manager, will conduct hands-on sessions on vaccinations, proper drenching techniques, FAMACHA scoring, body condition scoring and maintaining hoof health. Goat and lamb products will be available for sampling.

Registration is $10 per person and includes lunch. To register, visit www.ext.vsu.edu/calendar, click on the event and then click on the registration link. 

If you need further information or are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Mollie Klein at mklein@vsu.edu or call (804) 524-6960 / (800) 828-1120 (TDD) during business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. to discuss accommodations no later than five days prior to the event.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. VSU is an equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

AUTHORS’ NIGHT AT BRUNSWICK COUNTY LIBRARY

The Brunswick County Library will host Authors' Night, Monday, September 17, 5:30-7:30 PM. Authors included in this special event will be Valerie Burke, Lisa Clary, Catina Macklin, Joey and Vicky Powell, Teresa Stith, and Ronald Thornhill. Each author has ties to Brunswick County and writes on a variety of interests. Look in next week’s edition for more information on featured authors.

September 17th at Brunswick County Library will be an evening to remember. The Brunswick County Library, Lawrenceville, VA is part of the Meherrin Regional Library System. For more information please call 434-848-2418, visit www.meherrinlib.org.

Cecile “Sis” Charette

Cecile “Sis” Charette, 97, of South Prince George, formerly of Emporia, Virginia, passed away Friday, August 24, 2018, peacefully in her home.  She was born January 6, 1921 in Pawtucket, Rhode Island and was preceded in death by her husband of 47 years, Francis “Frank” Charette; son, Francis A. Charette; son-in-law, Lewis “Chip” Shifflett; her parents; five sisters and two brothers.

Cecile and her family moved to Emporia, Virginia, in 1951. She worked at Weldon Mills for over 30 years until retiring. She was a member of St. Richard’s Catholic Church until moving to South Prince George, where she became a member of Sacred Heart Catholic Church.

Mrs. Charette is survived by five daughters, Carolyn Williamson (Gene) of Atlanta, Georgia, Nancy Simpson of Midlothian, Virginia, Doris Shifflett of Emporia, Virginia, Sandra Jarratt (Kenny) of Branchville, Virginia and Joan Parrish (Marvin) of South Prince George, Virginia; daughter-in-law, Jillian Delaney of Martinsburg, West Virginia; one brother, Roland Quintin (Peggy) of Rhode Island; 13 grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

The family will receive friends 1-2 p.m. Saturday, August 25 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd, Jarratt, Virginia. The funeral service will be held graveside 3 p.m. at Sacred Heart Catholic Church Cemetery, 9300 Community Ln, South Prince George, Virginia.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to assist the family of hospice nurse Jim Grumblatt through Gofundme.com.

Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com

ATTORNEY GENERAL HERRING URGES CONGRESS TO CLOSE DEADLY FENTANYL LOOPHOLE

~ In Virginia, fentanyl deaths have gone up 1,337% since 2009 ~

RICHMOND (August 23, 2018) – Attorney General Mark R. Herring today joined a bipartisan coalition of 52 state and territory attorneys general to call on Congress to help end the opioid epidemic and close a loophole that allows those who traffic deadly fentanyl to stay a step ahead of law enforcement. Since 2009, Virginia has seen fentanyl overdose deaths increase by 1,337 percent.

“I remain committed to combatting the opioid crisis that is affecting communities across the Commonwealth and the country,” said Attorney General Herring. “Fentanyl has become the biggest driver of the rise in overdose deaths in Virginia and far too many Virginians are still losing their lives and loved ones to this dangerous drug. Fentanyl can be deadly in microscopic doses, which makes it a threat to law enforcement and first responders who are investigating or trying to treat an overdose. It’s also indistinguishable from heroin and other opioids, meaning that a user can suffer a fatal overdose on any use without even realizing what they are taking. We need to make it as hard as we can for criminals and drug dealers to get their hands on this deadly drug, which is why I am urging Congress to close this loophole.”

Attorney General Herring sent a letter to Congress in support of S. 1553 and H.R. 4922, Stopping Overdoses of Fentanyl Analogues (SOFA) Act. Fentanyl is currently a Schedule II controlled substance. However, outside of careful supervision, fentanyl and analogues manufactured illicitly can be lethal.

The SOFA Act, if passed by the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives, would eliminate the current loophole which keeps the controlled substance scheduling system one step behind those who manufacture fentanyl analogue and then introduce these powders into the opioid supply. The SOFA Act utilizes catch-all language which will allow the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to proactively schedule all newly-modified fentanyl analogues.

Fentanyl is a particularly dangerous drug because even the smallest of doses can be fatal and, in many cases, it is indistinguishable from heroin. It can be hundreds of times more powerful than morphine and much more powerful than heroin. In Virginia alone, 2,182 people have died from a fentanyl overdoes since 2007. Additionally, cartels have begun to import chemicals from China to create their own homemade batches of fentanyl that they then sell on the streets. Importing these chemicals from China has made it even more difficult for law enforcement officials to crack down on the drugs because of complicating factors like Chinese chemical control laws, import laws, and the dark web where people can easily buy and sell the ingredients needed to make these drugs.

The heroin and prescription opioid epidemic has been a top priority for Attorney General Herring. He and his team continue to attack the problem with a multifaceted approach that includes enforcementeducation,prevention, and legislation to encourage reporting of overdoses in progress, expand the availability of naloxone, and expand access to the Prescription Monitoring Program. He has supported federal efforts to improve the availability of treatment and recovery resources and made prescription drug disposal kits available across the Commonwealth. Attorney General Herring recently outlined his recommended next steps for combating the crisis, focusing on law enforcement initiatives, support from the medical community, and recovery, treatment, prevention and education. He and his team also continue to participate in a multistate investigation into the practices of additional drug manufacturers and distributors to determine what role they may have played in creating or prolonging the crisis and what accountability they should face.

Attorney General Herring and his team have handled 117 cases against heroin and fentanyl dealers and traffickers involving more than 667 pounds of heroin (302 kilograms) worth more than $37 million on the street. These cases against dealers and traffickers have involved 39 overdose victim fatalities as well as 47 overdose victims who survived.

The attorneys general who signed this letter include Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Microsoft Graduates First Group of Apprentices at Boydton, VA Datacenter

Anthony Putorek -Microsoft,Wendell Walker-DOL, James Rutherford-SVCC, Harley Ficke-DCC, Kelly Arnold-SVCC and Patricia Morrison-DOL

Inside Microsoft’s Boydton, Virginia, datacenter, cloud storage is racking up. While new expansion is flourishing outside, inside a new workforce training model is also racking up transformations. The datacenter adopted the apprenticeship model as the framework for training their network technicians. For the Microsoft datacenter network technicians, the apprenticeship model is producing results. The success of the apprenticeship model stems from the ability to marry educational instruction with on-the-job training (OJT).

Recently, two Microsoft datacenter employees, James Rutherford and Harley Ficke, successfully completed the two-year training program for Network Support Technician. In doing so, they completed six educational classes and worked 4000 hours of OJT. For their accomplishment, Microsoft held an awards ceremony where Patricia Morrison, Director of Registered Apprenticeship, and Wendell Walker, Apprenticeship Representative from the Department of Labor (DOL), spoke about James and Harley’s outstanding work. Both received a nationally recognized journeyman’s card, apprenticeship certificate, and a commemorative plaque from Microsoft.

Anthony Putorek, Lead Global Datacenter Field and Community Program Manager, spoke on Microsoft’s commitment to training. At the awards ceremony, Mr. Putorek stated, “This is the first datacenter facility to adopt the apprenticeship model for training. And because of the positive results we have seen here, we will replicate this program at our other US datacenters."

In the US, apprenticeship conjures the thoughts of skilled labor training, not a model of training for the high-tech computer world. So, when Microsoft looked locally for training programs, Southside Virginia Community College (SVCC) and Danville Community College (DCC) presented the apprentice framework as a solution. With an American Apprenticeship Initiative (AAI) grant from the DOL, funding for the educational component of the program was 100 percent covered. The objective of this grant was to train and up-skill the local workforce, which directly benefits Microsoft’s workforce - all 32 registered apprentices are working on completing the network support technician certification. 

Through the implementation process, Microsoft worked with Kelly Arnold, Apprenticeship Coordinator for SVCC, and Phil Baughman, DCC’s coordinator, to create a profile of the exact educational classes necessary for each apprentice. Through seated and on-line community college classes, each apprentice took classes that helped them achieve certifications in A+, Network +, Server + and Cisco.

Making recommendations and helping the employees select the correct coursework was necessary for them to be successful. As the program rolled out, Arnold stressed to each apprentice how these classes allowed them to receive college credit and industry recognized certifications, which easily builds into an Associate’s Degree in Networking. In the IT datacenter world, certifications are important. But for career pathways, small steps-six classes in this case, all enhance career potential.

For SVCC, Microsoft has helped build and outfit the new CITE (Center for Information Technology) lab in South Hill, VA. Microsoft donated racks of servers allowing the instructors who teach Networking classes to have real-world equipment to teach and clarify various scenarios. This lab now serves dual-enrollment high school students in the morning and adult learners, including apprentices, in the evening.

For many IT companies, mapping the bytes and bits necessary to train their employees can be a real challenge. Oftentimes, a simple plan can be overlooked, but for Microsoft, partnering with the community college and combining that with OJT, which is the apprenticeship model, was a logical choice.

ATTORNEY GENERAL HERRING FILES NEW BRIEF IN NET NEUTRALITY LAWSUIT

~ Herring joins 22 Attorneys General in urging DC Circuit to vacate and reverse FCC’s illegal rollback of net neutrality ~

RICHMOND (August 21, 2018) – Today, Attorney General Mark R. Herringfiled a new brief in the lawsuit to block the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) illegal rollback of net neutrality, urging the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to vacate and reverse the FCC’s order. Attorney General Herring is part of a coalition of 23 attorneys general that filed suit earlier this year.

“Having an open and fair internet is integral to economic, cultural and educational growth in the Commonwealth, by connecting Virginians to jobs, opportunities and experiences only accessible online,” said Attorney General Herring. “The FCC’s illegal rollback of net neutrality protections could open consumers up to internet providers who will take advantage of them, limit access to certain websites, slow down internet speeds, censor viewpoints they may not like, or even charge websites for priority access. These protections need to remain in place to make sure that ISPs provide fair services. I will continue to fight to keep the internet open for all Virginians.”

Attorney General Herring and his colleagues partnered with the County of Santa Clara, Santa Clara County Central Fire Protection District, and the California Public Utilities Commission in this brief. The non-government petitioners submitted a separate companion brief today and Attorney General Herring and the other attorneys general also joined the arguments made by the non-government petitioners in that brief.

Attorney General Herring’s brief focuses on two critical issues: first, that the FCC’s order is arbitrary and capricious, therefore putting consumers at risk of abusive practices by broadband providers, jeopardizing public safety, and more; and second, that the FCC’s order preempts state and local regulation of broadband service.

As Attorney General Herring’s brief states, “for more than fifteen years, the Federal Communications Commission has agreed that an open Internet free from blocking, throttling, or other interference by service providers is critical to ensure that all Americans have access to the advanced telecommunications services that have become essential for daily life. The recent Order represents a dramatic and unjustified departure from this long-standing commitment”.

The coalition of 23 attorneys general collectively represents over 165 million people – approximately 50 percent of the U.S. population – and includes the Attorneys General of New York, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Mexico, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

Virginia Rural Center’s Innovation in Broadband Roundtable Showcases Promising Solutions to the Challenge of Universal High-Speed Internet Access

Senator Emmett Hanger addresses participants at the Innovation in Broadband Roundtable in Prince George County, hosted by the Virginia Rural Center.

PRINCE GEORGE, Va., Nearly 150 state and local officials and business leaders convened in Prince George County on August 16 for an Innovation in Broadband Roundtable, sharing updates on the tangible successes and ongoing challenges faced by rural Virginians lacking increasingly vital high-speed internet access.

“Universal broadband is an economic necessity, it’s an educational necessity, it’s a moral necessity,” said panelist Evan Feinman, Executive Director of the Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission and Chief Broadband Advisor to Governor Northam.

The event was hosted by the Virginia Rural Center and held at the Prince George Central Wellness Center, one of the first places in the largely rural county to have received broadband thanks to a promising fiber-optic cable deployment program piloted by the Prince George Electric Cooperative (PGEC).

“When you have the right partner, you can stop talking about broadband, and you can start doing it,” said Prince George County Administrator Percy Ashcraft, noting that the county has won 5 awards from state and national organizations for its broadband partnership with the PGEC.

Building on the success of its pilot broadband program providing 30 Mbps speeds, the PGEC formally announced the launch of R4uralband, a new gigabit high-speed internet service offering that will soon be available to its residential and commercial customers. Dubbed R4, which stands for Rural, Reliable, Revolutionary and Responsible, the service will be delivered over a system-wide fiber optic network that PGEC is building to eventually connect all distribution equipment on its grid.

“We are using the history of the electric coop to chart a new course for fiber broadband in Prince George County, today,” said Jeff Stoke, Deputy County Administrator for Prince George County.

And while local partnerships with cooperatives have proven highly beneficial in certain rural communities where they exist, it will take a more holistic approach to fully solve the rural broadband issue according to Feinman.

“Ultimately the solution to universal broadband access is going to be patchwork – some folks will get fiber or coax service from the incumbent telecommunications company, some will get it from their electric coop, some will get it from their telephone coop, some will get it wirelessly,” Feinman explained.  “We’re going to engage all of those different efforts.”

Feinman explained that Virginia has some catching up to do around broadband initiatives, especially with respect to “last-mile” efforts.

“That said, Virginia is going to be one of the first states in the union, if not the first state in the union, to get broadband functionally to everybody,” said Feinman. “Governor Northam has said that we need to get him a plan to get it to everybody within 10 years. You’re going to see the first iteration of that plan in January.”

But the middle-mile remains critical, according to Tad Deriso, President and CEO of the Mid‐Atlantic Broadband Communities Corporation (MBC), which has 45 wholesale customers ranging from the largest cable companies in the state to the smallest internet service providers (ISPs).

“If you don’t have that wholesale capability to reach the internet, to reduce that cost of access, then all of the last-mile efforts are really not going to work very well,” said Deriso.

Additional discussions during the roundtable explored other technical solutions and organizational resources seeking to drive broadband efforts forward.

Bob Bailey, Executive Director of the Southern Virginia Innovation Center, discussed the advantages and potential for TV white space – the empty spectrum between over-the-air TV channels – as a broadband solution.  Besides requiring very little infrastructure, Bailey explained how this solution does not require line-of-sight to antennas and that there is plenty of unlicensed spectrum available, especially in rural areas.

Chuck Kirby, Executive Director of the Center for Innovative Technology (CIT), also gave an update on the state’s Broadband Advisory Council role in advising the Governor on policy and funding priorities to speed the cost-effective deployment of broadband access in the Commonwealth.

Kirby also highlighted an upcoming Virginia Broadband Summit that the CIT is hosting in partnership with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s BroadbandUSA Program. The summit will take place in Roanoke on October 30, 2018.

Broadband will also be a featured topic of discussion at the Virginia Rural Center’s annual Virginia Rural Summit, taking place October 21-22, 2018 at the Stonewall Jackson Hotel in Staunton.

While challenges remain and there is much work to be done, momentum and resources are building behind the universal broadband access movement.

“This is a 10-year effort, but it’s not a moonshot. We already know how to do this, and we already have the resources to do this. This is a question of whether or not we have the political will to do it,” said Feinman. “I believe based on the folks in the room, we do, so let’s make it happen.”

“This is what revitalization is going to look like in rural Virginia,” added Delegate Emily Brewer, who represents the state’s 64th district.

The roundtable concluded with a presentation by John Tyler Community College President Edward "Ted" Raspiller, who stressed the critical role that broadband plays for colleges who are now challenged to provide a distance learning experience that matches the in-class experience.

Raspiller offered a live demonstration of the power of broadband when he established a videoconference connection with a former distance learning student who described the tremendous impact broadband had on her life.

Struggling to juggle jobs that weren’t the right fit with the responsibilities of raising a young child, the student wanted to go back to school but knew that attending class in person was not the answer.

But online classes, enabled by broadband, offered a solution.

“Distance learning was my answer,” she explained. “And it was because of that little internet connection, that I am what I am today – having earned my master’s degree, doing purposeful work, and living a lifestyle that is much more comfortable for my family.”

“Ask yourself, what can a single internet connection do for you, for a family, for a community?” the student challenged the audience in conclusion.

For more information, visit www.cfrv.org.

Lewis D. Allen

Lewis D. Allen, 87, of Emporia, passed away Sunday, August 19, 2018. He was preceded in death by his wife, Barbara Vincent Allen; his son, Larry Allen; daughter, Wanda Lankford and brother, Benton Allen.

Mr. Allen is survived by four sons, J. W. Allen and wife, Patricia, Randy Allen, Stanley Allen and wife, Cindy, and Barry Allen; seven grandchildren, Ashley Burns and husband, Adam, Jessica Hevener and husband, Michael, Kathleen Crowder and husband, Dwayne, Ryan Allen, Brianna Allen, David Allen and Lee Hunter; five great-grandchildren and a half-brother, James Allen and wife, Pam.

The family will receive friends 6-8 p.m. Friday, August 24 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd, Jarratt, Virginia. The funeral service will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, August 25 at Calvary Baptist Church. Interment will follow at Greensville Memorial Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to Calvary Baptist Church, 310 N. Main St., Emporia, Virginia 23847.

Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

VCU Health CMH Team Member of the Month July 2018

(Left to Right) W. Scott Burnette, CEO, VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital presented Bertha Evans, Environmental Services Supervisor, the VCU Health CMH STAR Service Team Member of the Month Award for July.  There to congratulate Bertha was Todd Howell, Vice President of Professional Services.

Bertha has been employed at VCU Health CMH for 17 years.  Her dedication and work ethic are just two of the qualities that make her a wonderful asset to VCU Health CMH.  The nomination form submitted on her behalf stated, “Bertha consistently exceeds expectations.  She is a wonderful example of whom a supervisor should be in that she never asks of her team anything she wouldn’t do herself.  She always has a warm and approachable manner.  Bertha recently went above and beyond to find a patients phone that had been lost in a linen pile.  Bertha along with her team member Linda Wilkins took on the challenge and found the phone while having a positive attitude. There isn’t a time that she has not stepped up to resolve an issue, especially for patients.”

In addition to the award certificate, Bertha received a STAR Service lapel pin, letter of commendation from Administration, a $40 gift certificate, and a parking place of her choice for the month.

Bertha resides in South Hill, VA.

Isaiah Stephens Competes in Hershey National Junior Olympic Championships

Lazers’ Track member, Isaiah Stephens competed in the 2018 USA Track & Field Hershey National Jr. Olympics Championship at North Carolina AT& T State University in Greensboro, NC. Stephens competed in the javelin and discus field events for 13-14 boys age group.  He is ranked #20 in the discus and ranked #28 in the javelin in the USA.

Isaiah and his mother, La-Tina Smith would like to thank everyone for their support.  They give special thanks and blessings to his Coach Les Young.

In Virginia town, African-American elders hold mixed views on confederate statue

The Confederate statue in Leesburg, Virginia, does not represent a certain Confederate figure, but rather a generic Confederate soldier. (Capital News Service photo).

By ALEXANDRIA CAROLAN, Capital News Service

LEESBURG, Virginia -- Gertrude Evans, 70, was born into the Jim Crow South and lived through the rocky integration of Leesburg when firemen filled a swimming pool with cement and garbage rather than permit its integration.

More than a half-century later, she turned to art as therapy to work through that traumatic period when she wasn’t allowed to sit on the red stools at Little John’s drugstore or watch a movie at the neighborhood Tally Ho theater.

The white nationalist rally in Charlottesville last year brought “everything to the surface,” she told Capital News Service recently. “…  I mean you see (racism), you see it.”

For the first time, she said, she’s been thinking too about the Confederate statue in front of the Leesburg courthouse. She doesn’t believe it should be moved but, still, “it’s the first thing you see” downtown.

“It causes conversation — good.” But “take it down and put it in Ball’s Bluff (Battlefield), you’ll never see it again,” she said. History will be forgotten.

Leesburg’s statue, like so many others around the country, became the subject of renewed concern following the 2015 murder of nine black church members by a white supremacist who posed on social media with a Confederate flag. One member of the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors has recommended the statue be moved to Ball’s Bluff Battlefield two and a half miles away where the Confederacy defeated the Union.

Virginia law prevents the county from moving or relocating the monument. In September 2017, the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors decided not to ask the state for authority to move the statue, but it asked the county’s heritage commission to make recommendations this summer regarding the statue and its surroundings.

Capital News Service recently interviewed community members in Leesburg as part of a series exploring the views of African-American and white residents in five southern cities where Confederate statues stand on public land in front of courthouses.

Teams of reporters traveled to Anderson, South Carolina; Easton, Maryland; Elizabeth City, North Carolina; Franklin, Tennessee; and Leesburg, Virginia. They also interviewed leaders of the Maryland Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

Most residents, black and white, were wary of taking dramatic steps, such as removing the statues, that would inflame tensions within their communities and could make it more difficult for future generations to understand the Civil War and segregationist Jim Crow eras. Most residents also said they preferred adding more context to Civil War memorials than removing them all together.

Derek Summers Jr., 36, and the founder of Loudoun County’s Citizens’ Committee against Domestic Violence, said he feels the Confederate statue’s gun pointing at him when he drives or walks past it on North King Street nearly every day.

“It’s like letting you know that in the hearts and mind of some of these folk here, the fight’s not over,” said Summers, seated on a bench next to the statue.

David Dixon, 59, owner of Jackson’s Barber Shop a few blocks down the road, has passed the statue on his commute to Leesburg for 24 years. He said the monument doesn’t bother him.

“My personality and the way I am, I really don’t care,” he said. “ … I look more toward the future than the past.”

Marquez Mitchell has passed the Leesburg statue when he visits Jackson’s for a haircut every few weeks. Confederate monuments “represent hatred and slavery, even though on paper they said we were free,” the Harpers Ferry resident said.

As a child, 41-year-old Chris Johnson would go to concerts near the courtyard of the statue. Johnson, a lifelong Leesburg resident, said the statue doesn’t bother him, but “what it stands for” does.

“They don’t need to destroy it necessarily, because there are people who find value in it. But I think for the greater good it is something that should be moved,” Johnson said.

Jim Roberts who leads a walking tour to commemorate African-American history here, leaves the statue off his itinerary. As a child, Roberts played near the statue and never paid much attention to it. He believes the newcomers are offended by it, not so much the old-timers.

“I can’t waste time thinking about what happened 150 years ago because it’s over and done with,” he said.

Horace Nelson Lassiter, 84, a barber at Robinson’s Barber shop which opened in 1962 said the statue “doesn’t bother me. I don’t care what is already done,” he said.

Lassiter was one of the first black police officers in the Loudoun County Deputy Sheriff’s Department in the 1960’s, and took the position “to show black people that they could get a job.”

“There’s still racism (in Leesburg). It hasn’t changed ... It’s not the younger people, it’s the older people in my age group,” Lassiter said.

Lassiter’s wife, Mary Louise Lassiter, 81, a prominent activist in Loudoun County and former local NAACP chapter president wants the statue to stay and for visitors to understand the pain slaves went through on courthouse grounds.

“When they’re told, hopefully they’ll understand the torture of all of those people who were put in those stocks.”

Formerly A Slave Market, Now a Favorite Lunch Spot

The square where the statue sits operated as a slave market throughout of the Civil War. Today the statue is surrounded by restaurants, coffee shops, a bar and the original courthouse. Government employees often lunch feet away from where whipping posts, cages and auction blocks once stood.

While the slave auctions in Leesburg were much smaller than those in other Virginia towns, the courthouse was the epicenter of the city’s slavery institution. In 1856, the court ordered that whippings move off courthouse property, according to newspaper advertisements at the time.

Three lynchings of black men accused of crimes also took place in Leesburg, in 1880, 1889 and 1902, according to the “Lynching in Virginia” history project at George Mason University.

Six years later, in 1908, the United Daughters of the Confederacy’s Leesburg chapter paid to have the statue erected to commemorate soldiers who had died in the war. Like most

Confederate statues across the South, the Leesburg statue’s unveiling came during “a terrible period of disenfranchisement — the Jim Crow period where enforced segregation and disenfranchisement really started to bleed,” said Jim Hall, author of the “Last Lynching in Northern Virginia.”

The president of the Leesburg chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy declined to comment, but the national organization has said it does not support racism, white supremacy or the white nationalists who rallied in Charlottesville, and that it opposes their use of Confederate symbols.  Many of its members say the Civil War was not about preserving slavery, a view historians dispute.

“The statues that celebrate the Confederacy were put up when African-Americans were demanding to be treated like human beings,” Loudoun County Board of Supervisors Chair said Phyllis Randall, the only member of the board to vote in favor of asking the state for authority over the statue.

Known as "Loudoun's silent sentinel," the bronze figure built by famed sculptor Frederick William Sievers is a soldier with his gun cocked and his eyes fixed forward. It stands higher than both the Korean War monument to the right of the courthouse entrance and the Revolutionary War monument to the left.

In 2005, the local United Daughters of the Confederacy chapter organized the cleaning and rededication of the statue.

It was cleaned with ground up walnut shells to help dissolve the mint green oxidation covering it.

Statue Oversees Businesses District

The generic soldier has an unobstructed view of the Downtown Saloon, a biker bar established in the 1960’s and decorated in bras and Confederate symbols. The menus have images of the courthouse and statue on them. The bar sells T-shirts with art of the statue. Sometimes, motorcycle riding members of the Mechanized Cavalry of the Sons of Confederate Veterans visit and park outside.

A sticker on the mirror behind the bar says “Dixie Rider,” overlayed on top of a Confederate flag.

Scott Warner, in a black T-shirt with a Confederate flag on the left pocket, said of the statue: “Any soldier who dies for what he believes in needs to be honored.” The statue’s fate has “become a political issue and it shouldn’t be,” he said. “It’s our history.”

Not many people paid attention to the statue “until Charlottesville,” said 46-year-old Jim Boyce, seated in the restaurant. “You can’t get rid of everything,” he said. “If you get rid of everything, the history isn’t here.”

Margaret Brown, a member of the Black History Committee at the local Thomas Balch Library, protested against the statue last summer after the march in Charlottesville. She said the biker bar was an intimidating presence for protestors.

“There were some guys who were across the bar who were pretty aggressive with their motorcycles,” revving the engines and glaring at the protestors, she said.

Phillip Thompson, president of the Loudoun County NAACP, said the statue shouldn’t be located in a place for justice. “The courthouse is a seat of power and people were trying to send a message to black citizens,” he said.

Pastor Michelle Thomas, a member of the nine-person commission assessing the future of the statue, said the statue “has the microphone —  of hate and oppression and fear.”

Evans, though, has mixed feelings. The statue controversy has made her want to know more about the Civil War era.

“I know my ancestors were enslaved. But I don’t know how they were treated,” she said. “It just makes me think and wonder … I’m very interested in that whole era.”

CNS staff writers Ariel Guillory and Elisee Browchuk contributed to this report.

Raleigh R. Jones, Sr.

Raleigh R. Jones, Sr., 84, of Emporia, passed away Saturday, August 18, 2018. He was preceded in death by his wife, Katherine T. Jones and all five of his brothers. He was also preceded in death by his longtime devoted companion, Joyce Whitehead just earlier this year.

Mr. Jones is survived by two sons and their families, Raleigh Jones, Jr. and wife, Lillian and Patrick Jones and wife, Kathy; six grandchildren, twelve great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

The family will receive friends 6-8 p.m. Monday, August 20 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd., Jarratt, Virginia. The funeral service with full military honors will be held 11 a.m. Tuesday, August 21 at Emporia Cemetery. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

Clarice Elizabeth (Betty) Padgett

Clarice Elizabeth (Betty) Padgett, 81, of Jarratt,  died Wednesday, August 15, 2018. She was the widow of the late Preston Arnold Padgett. She was also preceded in death by her parents, Calvin and Alma Gregory, a granddaughter, Blair Alexis Padgett, and a niece, Angie Gregory. She is survived by three daughters, Karen Padgett of Emporia,VA; Pat Padgett of Ridgeway,VA;and Shirley Slagle  and fiancé Gerald Lee and son Blake of emporia,VA; one son Michael Padgett and wife Sherry of Jarratt,VA; five grandchildren, John Banty and wife Brandy of Windsor, VA, Megan Davis and husband G.W. of Emporia Hunter Padgett of Chesapeake,VA, Brianna Padgett of Jarratt,VA, and Patton Carroll and wife Michelle of South Port N.C. and one great-grandson Jase Banty. The family will receive friends Friday August 17, 2018 at Owen Funeral Home in Jarratt,VA from 6:00 P.M.until 8:30 P.M.  where the funeral service will be held Saturday, August 18, 2108 at 11:00 A.M. with interment to follow at High Hills Memorial Cemetery.

Brunswick Academy First Day of 2018-19 School Year

Brunswick Academy's First Day of School on August 14th, 2018.
 

 

Siblings, Carter (11th Grade) & Reagan (10th Grade) Saunders
 
 
Kindergartener, Holland Council
 
 
4th Grader, Koen Morris
 
 
The Class of 2019's LAST FIRST DAY

Landon Edwards is getting used to having a locker in 6th grade.

Brunswick Academy Class of 2019 Senior-First Grade March

Brunswick Academy held one of their oldest traditions on Wednesday, August 15th.  The Senior- First Grade March has been done at B.A. for many years.  Each Senior introduces their First Grade friend. Pictured is the B.A. Class of 2019 and their First Grade friends, the B.A. Class of 2030.

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces Employee of the Quarter

Emporia, VA – Vickie Michael has been named the Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) Employee of the Quarter. Ms. Michael, who works in SVRMC’s Laboratory, has been employed at SVRMC since May 1978.

Each quarter employees are nominated for demonstrating excellence in any or all of ten Standards of Behavior.  Ms. Michael’s nomination included the following statement:  “Vickie’s commitment to her co-workers and sense of ownership is demonstrated by her quality of work.  She has been instrumental to the Lab’s success with many Joint Commission surveys. Although her co-workers in the Lab know the importance of her role, many of SVRMC’s other staff members do not realize the hard work, long hours, and effort it takes to prepare for Lab Joint Commission surveys.  Vickie, along with her co-workers, is a vital part of ensuring that success.  We would like to take this opportunity to thank Vickie for everything she does all year to ensure SVRMC’s Laboratory Services meet those regulations for the safety of our patients.”

As SVRMC’s Employee of the Quarter, Ms. Michael received a certificate of recognition, balloons, cookies to share with her co-workers, a cash award, and a chance to be selected as SVRMC’s 2018 Employee of the Year.

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