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2019-1-23

GREENSVILLE/EMPORIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

LOCAL BOARD MEETING

The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services Administrative Board will hold its regular meeting Thursday, July 18, 2019, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services located at 1748 East Atlantic Street.

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Ruth Weimer Tillar

Ruth Weimer Tillar (1923-2019)

Visitation Services

Friday, January 25, 6-8 pm

Echols Funeral Home, Emporia

Saturday, January 26th at 2 pm

First Presbyterian Church of Emporia

Reseption to follow in Fellowship Hall

Ruth Weimer Tillar, 95, of Emporia, VA passed away on January 21, 2019 at the Eugene Bloom Retirement Center. She was married for 57 years to the late Thomas Cato Tillar, Sr. and is survived by her son Thomas Cato Tillar, Jr. of Blacksburg, VA and daughter Elizabeth Kennedy Tillar of Tamworth, NH. Ruth was a devoted mother, grandmother, aunt and friend.

Ruth was a 1945 graduate of the College of William & Mary and a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority. She was an avid alumna of the College who served as President of the Olde Guarde Alumni Board, established the Ruth Tillar Student Prize, and received recognition for her service with the Alumni Service Award, the Distinguished Service Award, and the William & Mary Alumni Medallion. She was also active with recognition societies at Virginia Tech and Colonial Williamsburg.

Ruth was a longtime member of the First Presbyterian Church of Emporia where she served in various leadership roles. Her many community activities included the Emporia Book Club, the Beta Sigma Phi Sorority, Emporia Rotary, Riparian Women’s Club and National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Her civic involvement further included the Southern  Regional Medical Center, the Emporia Industrial Development Authority, the Regional Airport Commission, the Civic Center Foundation, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Village View Foundation. Earlier in her career she taught high school in Blacksburg and Greensville County, Virginia.

The family will receive friends from 6-8 pm on Friday, January 25th at Echols Funeral Home in Emporia. A funeral service will be held the following day on Saturday, January 26th at 2 pm at the First Presbyterian Church of Emporia, followed by a reception in the Fellowship Hall.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in her honor are encouraged to the College of William & Mary Foundation, Williamsburg, VA 23187.  

Online condolences may be sent to the family at: www.echols funeralhome.com

VIRGINIA VEHICLE INSPECTION STICKERS REDESIGNED

New Safety Approval Sticker Promotes “Move Over” Safety Message

RICHMOND – The Virginia State Police Safety Division is rolling out a newly-designed vehicle safety approval inspection sticker that now includes a traffic safety message. Effective Jan. 1, 2019, all certified Virginia inspection stations began issuing the sticker which has been reduced from 2.75 inches in height to 2 inches and from 4 inches in length to 3 inches. The year of expiration is now permanently affixed to the right side of the sticker, with the only insert being the month of expiration. Even though the overall size has been reduced, the month has been enlarged to provide better visibility.

“The change in size is in response to the feedback State Police received from Virginians following the sticker’s relocation to the bottom left corner of the windshield in 2018,” said Captain R.C. Maxey Jr., Virginia State Police Safety Division Commander. “We heard from a number of motorists who had difficulty seeing around the sticker, so we worked to reduce its size to slightly smaller than the average credit card.”

The sticker’s security features have also been enhanced in order to discourage and prevent unauthorized removal, tampering and counterfeit practices. The changes in size and design do not apply to motorcycle or trailer safety inspection stickers. Vehicle rejection stickers also remain unchanged.

Another new feature of the inspection sticker enables State Police to reach an estimated 8.2 million motorists annually with a reminder about Virginia’s “Move Over” law. This portion of the sticker is not for display on the front windshield. Instead, it is detached by the inspector and provided to the customer. Virginia’s “Move Over” law requires motorists to move over a lane when approaching an emergency vehicle stopped alongside the road. If unable to move over, then drivers are required to cautiously pass the emergency vehicle. The law applies to all vehicles equipped with red, blue and amber lights.

The placement of the sticker was changed in 2018 from the center of the windshield to the bottom, left corner due to safety concerns related to automotive innovations in recent years. The center placement of the sticker could prevent a vehicle’s crash avoidance system from operating properly.

Senate Panel Kills Bill To Update Law For Same-Sex Parents

Panel Takes Step Toward Legalizing Casino Gambling

Senate Passes Bill To Address Virginia Food Deserts

HERRING WARNS VIRGINIANS ABOUT SCAMS RELATED TO GOVERNMENT SHUT DOWN

RICHMOND (January 22, 2019) – Attorney General Mark R. Herring is warning Virginians who have been furloughed because of the government shutdown, or those who wish to help federal workers, to be vigilant and look out for scams related to the shutdown. Shutdown related scams could include fake employment offers for “side jobs”, predatory lenders taking advantage of temporarily unpaid Virginians, and fake charities that claim to be working on behalf of federal workers.
 
“As the government shutdown enters its fifth week, it is important for Virginians, especially those who work for the Federal Government, to be vigilant and pay close attention to potential scams,” said Attorney General Herring. “Unfortunately, individuals will capitalize on federal workers’ vulnerabilities and lack of income during this time and try and take advantage of them. People who are affected by the government shutdown have enough to worry about and should not also have to worry about a scammer preying on them. My consumer protection team and I will continue to do all we can to protect Virginians from getting ripped off and taken advantage of.”
 
Virginians are encouraged to remember the following tips during the Federal Government shutdown:
 
Fake Employment Offers
  • Be wary of emails that appear to be from major retailers offering positions at local stores unless you've applied for a position, use caution when proceeding.
  • Cross reference any emails with the company's website to see if they have openings.
  • Watch out for imposters using the names of real employees at legitimate businesses.
  • Be wary of interviews conducted through Hangouts, Skype, or Facetime.
  • If using sites like Craigslist to find a job, use the "too good to be true" rule of thumb. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Here are a few warning signs to look for:
  • High pay rates for simple tasks
  • Receiving a Job offer without an interview
  • Requesting up-front payments and personal information
  • Contact information and address are missing and an online search doesn't turn up the company's name   
  • Never provide your Social Security number or personal information unless you are certain the company and job offer are legitimate.
  • Most legitimate companies do not ask for personal information over email or by unsolicited phone call.
  • Never reply to a suspicious email or provide personal information to an unsolicited phone call.
 
Predatory Lending
  • Familiarize yourself with the risks associated with small-dollar loans including payday, auto title, open-end, and online loans, and understand your rights when taking out one of these potentially risky loans.
  • Payday Loans
  • Limitations on interest and other fees—Interest on a payday loan is generally capped at 36% annually. Lenders may not charge more than 20% of the loan proceeds as a loan fee, and may only charge a $5 verification fee for checking the state’s payday loan database prior to issuing a loan. For a one-month loan of $500, the total APR will be 288%.
  • Length of loans—The term of a payday loan must be at least twice the borrower’s pay cycle so they have a better chance of repaying it. After that time, lenders cannot charge interest of more than 6% per year.
  • Loan amount—Lenders cannot loan more than $500 to a borrower. 
  • Number of loans—Lenders cannot issue more than one loan at a time to a borrower.
  • Number of loans in a 180-day period—If a borrower receives and pays off 5 payday loans in a 180-day period, there is a mandatory 45-day cooling off period when a lender cannot issue another loan to that borrower.
  • Loans to military personnel—Lenders cannot make a payday loan to a borrower who is a member of the armed forces or one of his or her dependents.
  • Auto Title Loans
  • Interest—Title lenders can charge interest based on the following sliding scale:
  • 22% per month on the first $700 in principal;
  • 18% per month on any amount above $700 up to $1,400; and
  • 15% per month on any amount above $1,400.  
  • For a one-month loan of $500, the total APR of the loan will be 264%.
  • Length of a loan— The loan term must be between 120 days (four months) and one year. 
  • Number of loans—Only one loan may be issued at a time to each borrower, or on each title.
  • Amount of loan—The amount loaned cannot exceed 50% of the value of the vehicle. 
  • Post-repossession protections—After default, a lender generally may only repossess the vehicle. They cannot continue to charge interest on the loan.
  • Loans to military personnel—Lenders cannot make a title loan to a borrower who is a member of the armed forces or one of his or her dependents.
  • Open-End Credit Plan Loans
  • Lenders are increasingly exploiting a loophole and steering borrowers towards open-end credit plans that afford borrowers very few consumer protections and can expose borrowers to unlimited interest rates.
  • These loans can be offered by both online and brick-and-mortar lenders, often using phrases like “line of credit” and “cash advance.”
  • While open-end credit loans might look like more traditional loans, open-end credit lines can stay open for an unlimited amount of time and lenders can often charge unlimited interest.
  • One of the few consumer protections in this area is a 25-day “grace period” during which the borrower has an opportunity to pay off the loan without interest or other finance charges, but once the 25-day grace period expires, a lender can charge an unlimited interest rate.
  • Online Loans
  • Online loans are generally subject to Virginia’s “usury statutes” which limits them to a 12% interest rate. If the interest rate is higher than 12% you should avoid taking out a loan and report the lender to Attorney General Herring’s Consumer Protection Section.
  • Be wary of closed-end installment lenders that operate online and make loans to Virginia consumers because they are not required to be licensed by the SCC under current law.
  • Alternatives to Predatory Loans
  • Before obtaining a potentially predatory loan from a non-traditional lender, consumers should consider their other alternatives.
  • Traditional lenders—See if you can meet your needs through a traditional lender such as a bank, credit union, or consumer finance company, which typically will have a longer term and lower interest rates. Even if it is a small amount, a community bank or credit union may be willing to loan you the money you need.
  • Credit card cash advance—If you have a traditional credit card with remaining credit available, obtain a credit card cash advance, which will often have a lower interest rate than that offered by a payday or motor vehicle title lender.
  • Negotiation with creditors and companies—If you need money because you are having temporary trouble keeping up with routine bills, speak with your creditors, explain the financial difficulties you are having, and see if they will let you enter into a payment plan to take care of what you owe them.   
  • Personal connections—Consider whether you can get a temporary loan from family, friends, your congregation or place of worship, or a local charity.
  • Military options—If you are in the military, check with the applicable military aid society to see if they have any financial assistance programs that could be of use.
  • Authorized overdraft—Some banks will allow an authorized overdraft that may be preferable to taking out a risky loan that could saddle you with debt for months or years. If you utilize this option, be sure you understand the associated limitations, rates, or penalties.
 
Charitable Donations
  • Only give to charities and fundraisers you can confirm are reliable and legitimate. Scrutinize charities with consumer advocates or friends and find out how much of your donation will go to the charity's programs and services.
  • Be especially cautious if you do not initiate the contact with the charity.
  • Do not be pressured into giving. Legitimate organizations will not expect you to contribute immediately.
  • Ask for written information about the charity, including name, address, and telephone number. Legitimate organizations will give you materials about the charity's mission, how your donation will be used, and proof that your contribution is tax-deductible. Just because a "charity" has a tax identification number does not mean your contribution is tax-deductibl
  • Avoid cash donations. Make checks payable to the charitable organization and not to an individual collecting a donation. For security and tax record purposes, you may wish to pay by credit card.
  • If a charity is soliciting contributions in Virginia, verify its registration with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services' Office of Charitable and Regulatory Programs (OCRP) at (804) 786-1343, or by searching OCRP's Charitable Organization Database online: http://cos.va-vdacs.com/cgi-bin/char_search.cgi
  • While a legitimate charity should be registered with OCRP to solicit contributions in Virginia, registration alone does not mean that the organization will be effective in aiding people affected by the government shutdown.

 
Many localities in Northern Virginia have centralized resources for residents who are impacted by the Federal Shutdown.
 
Since 2014, Attorney General Herring’s Consumer Protection Section has recovered more than $273 million in relief for consumers and payments from violators. Following a major reorganization and enhancement in 2016, the OAG’s Consumer Protection Section has been even more effective in fighting for the rights of Virginians.
 
If you think you have been a victim of a scam, you should contact Attorney General Herring's Consumer Protection Section to file a complaint or to get additional information about any consumer protection related matter:

Event Promotes Racial Reconciliation on Virginia’s 400th Anniversary

Citizens Advocate for Gun Control from Both Sides at the Capitol

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