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2017-4-3

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Transform your ideas about the library: celebrate National Library Week April 9-15

The Meherrin Regional Library System joins libraries in schools, campuses and communities nationwide in celebrating the many ways libraries are transforming their communities every day through the services and invaluable expertise they offer.

April 9-15 is National Library Week, a time to highlight the changing role of libraries, librarians, and library workers.  Libraries aren’t only a place of quiet study, but also creative and engaging community centers where people can collaborate using new technologies.

Libraries of all types are evolving to meet the needs of the communities they serve. Elected officials, small business owners, students, and the public at large depend upon libraries and the resources they offer to address the needs of their communities. By providing such resources as e-books and computer assistance, materials for English-language learners, programs for job seekers, or a safe haven in times of crisis, libraries and librarians transform their communities.

The Meherrin Regional Library System is transforming by providing computers, printers, WIFI, and copy services in addition to the books, movies, and magazines available to check out. The library offers weekly storytimes and Summer Reading Programs, as well as meeting room spaces. The Meherrin Regional Library’s friendly staff is there to guide and assist the library patrons who visit each day.

Libraries also offer something unique to their communities - the expertise of individual librarians. Librarians assist patrons in using increasingly complex technology and sorting through the potentially overwhelming mass of information bombarding today’s digital society. This is especially crucial when access to reliable and trustworthy data is more important than ever.

First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April. 

 

To learn more about your local library, visit the Brunswick County Library, Lawrenceville or the Richardson Memorial Library, Emporia or the library’s Web site at www.meherrinlib.org.

Greensville Schools to host Child Find

Greensville County Public Schools will sponsor Child Find on Friday, April 28, 2017 from 10 am until 5 pm at Greensville Elementary School.

Child Find is registration for Head Start or Virginia Preschool Initiative.

Head Start is a federal preschool program which provides comprehensive services and learning experiences to prepare children for Kindergarten and move families toward self-sufficiency. The program also operates in compliance with IDEA to include children with special needs. All Head Start services are free to children and families.

The Virginia Preschool Initiative, established in 1995, distributes state funds to schools and community based organizations to provide quality preschool program for at-risk four-year-olds. The program offers full day Pre-kindergarten, parent involvement, child health and social services, and transportation to families with four-year-olds at risk of school failure.

Parents of all children who are or will be four years old on or before September 30th and are residents of Emporia or Greensville County are encouraged to attend. There will be NO TESTING. Children do NOT need to attend!

To apply, you must bring your child’s OFFICIAL birth certificate (NOT a hospital certificate), immunization record, PROOF of residency (for example: a current water/electric bill with YOUR name and address) and, because of NEW state guidelines, verification of household income (for example: paystub, W-2, Medicaid card, TANF, SNAP, WIC, SSI).

 

 

 

Southside Virginia Community College (SVCC) Chorus Presents the 2017 Spring Concert

 

EVENT:

“American Homeland”

Spring Concert

Songs of American Values: faith, courage, beauty, hope and love.

 

Southside Virginia Community College Chorus

Directed by Carol Henderson

Accompanied by Sally Tharrington

DATE:

Sunday, April 23, 2017

TIME:

 7:00 P.M.

PLACE:

South Hill Presbyterian Church

914 Mecklenburg Ave. South Hill, VA  23970

ADMISSION: Free - Sponsored by Southside Virginia Community College

The “American Homeland” 2017 Spring Concert will offer songs of American Values: faith, courage, beauty, hope and love. Beginning with the solo, American Anthem by Gene Scheer, sung by soprano Betty Edwards with Sally Tharrington at the piano. This song reminds us of “the dream of a nation where freedom would endure.” How this nation is built on the gifts of each generation and the “quiet acts of dignity” that fortify “the soul of a nation that never dies.”

Judy Kemp, past Director of the SVCC Chorus for 15 years, will play with Sally in a unique piano duet accompaniment arranged by Mark Hayes of the traditional American song Hark, I Hear the Harps Eternal. Judy is the current Program Chair and Vice-President of the South Hill Music Club of the National Federation of Music Clubs.

Proudly featured in the SVCC Chorus concert, is a new hymn text written by one of the chorus’ members, Rev. Dr. Stephen DeOrnellas, Blessed Is The Nation Whose God Is The Lord. Sung to the Irish tune, Slane and based on Psalm 33:12, we pray for new hearts, wise love, and Christ-like courage. Stephen is the Pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Baskerville.

Other musical highlights by the SVCC Chorus include the Appalachian song, Down to the River to Pray; the new spiritual Order My Steps ( In Your Word), written by Glenn Burleigh and recorded by the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir, 1996; and from the 60’s, Pete Seeger’s Turn! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There Is a Season). In Over the Rainbow, the classic, award-winning song from the “Wizard of OZ”, why can’t we fly like the bluebirds, and have our troubles melt away in the clouds?

The men of the SVCC chorus sing The Quest: The Impossible Dream, the quintessential song of the search for the unattainable, from the “Man of LaMancha.” In Stained Glass, a new song by Joseph Martin and Heather Sorenson, the Artist’s hand picks up the shattered, scattered, broken pieces of our life. “Who would have known that God would make art from glass stained and broken, from lives torn apart.” Also included is the simple truth found in that Sunday school favorite: Jesus Loves Me, arranged by Fred Bock with Debussy’s Clair de Lune.  The favorite of church, community and school choirs across the country: Let There Be Peace on Earth closes out the program of beautiful tunes that lift up the values of our “American Homeland.”

Singers this spring in SVCC Chorus are from the surrounding communities and include:

Elizabeth Allgood, Dan Araway, Nancy Bradshaw, Robert Bradshaw, Stephen DeOrnellas, Betty Edwards, Jo Ann Farnsworh, Lloyd Farnsworth, Martha Feagan, Tim Feagan, Mary Hardin, Megan Henry, Patricia Jutz, Becky Laben, John Laben, Kelli Lewis, Jimmy Martin, Judy Moody, Pat Moyles, Louise Ogburn, Guy Pealer, Janie Pealer, Laura Jane Rash, Norma Robertson, Walter Smyre, Jimmie Soyars, Nancy Turner, Debbie Wilson, and Margie Wollenberg. 

Southside Virginia Community College is proud to sponsor and present the SVCC Chorus in a concert for our “American Homeland.” Please bring your friends, neighbors and families for an inspirational Spring evening of music at South Hill Presbyterian Church on Sunday, April 23rd at 7:00 PM. Free admission.

For information regarding joining the SVCC Community Chorus, please contact Nancy Turner at Nancy.Turner@southside.edu or Louise.Ogburn@southside.edu.  

‘My illness is not larger than my world’ Despite pain, student excels in class and in life

By Dai Já Norman, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Pictures of family members and friends and a British flag cover the walls of her dorm room at Virginia Commonwealth University. Anatomy textbooks, note cards and a Himalayan pink salt crystal lamp occupy her desk.

On Majesta-Doré Legnini’s nightstand is an assortment of prescription and over-the-counter pill bottles. She takes six pills every evening and one in the morning, along with three vitamin supplements. “I am in pain every second of my life,” the 19-year-old sophomore says.

Legnini describes the feeling this way:

“Imagine your legs are stuck between a bed frame and a box spring. And they are under the box spring, and then there’s a mattress, and then there’s an anvil, and then there’s a 500-pound-man sitting on top of the anvil playing a grand piano. That’s what it feels like.”

Legnini was recently diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos syndrome, a rare disorder that afflicts connective tissues and joints. But she has been fighting through the pain as an honors student, a double major (health science and political science) and a community volunteer, working with homeless and mentally ill people.

Although EDS tries to slow her down, Legnini (pronounced lay-NEE-nee) lives a fast-paced life.

On campus, she is a member of the VCU Honors College and VCU Globe, a living and learning program that focuses on global education and international experiences. She helps arrange campus tours for the Undergraduate Admissions Office and leads Their Home RVA, a website and student organization dedicated to improving community relations – especially between VCU students and the homeless population.

Off campus, Legnini is an intern at the Daily Planet, which provides health care and other services to homeless individuals and other people in need. She also is a writer for The Mighty, a website for people with disabilities, diseases, mental illness and other challenges to share their stories.

Susan Sereke, advancement coordinator for the Daily Planet, said Legnini is a testimony to the power of passion.

Legnini is driven by “her passion about the issues of health care and homelessness, and a desire to improve the lives of others,” Sereke said.

About Ehlers Danlos syndrome

EDS is genetic. Symptoms can range from mildly loose joints and hyperelastic skin to debilitating musculoskeletal pain and aortic dissection, a life-threatening heart condition. At least one in 5,000 people have some form of the illness, according to the Ehlers Danlos Society, a support group.

Legnini says she has been wracked by pain from her earliest memories. As a child, she remembers crying when she went on long walks. She was always prone to injuries when playing sports.

Growing up, she sought medical attention numerous times, but doctors dismissed her complaints, attributing them to growing pains. Last May, Legnini’s condition worsened, and she decided to try her luck again by seeing another physician.

“Pain became more frequent,” Legnini recalled. “I felt weaker. I was getting exhausted by seemingly simple activities. It started to become difficult to concentrate, and most importantly PAIN, PAIN, PAIN. It got more intense, more frequent, and made my life much more difficult.”

After almost a year of doctor visits and road trips between Richmond and Manassas, a rheumatologist diagnosed Legnini as having EDS. Legnini was already familiar with the illness: Her best friend also has a form of EDS.

In fact, during high school, Legnini did a lot of research about the disease and even helped raise money for theEDS research center in Maryland. While researching the disease, Legnini thought she might have the symptoms but then rejected that notion as a projection of her friend’s situation.

Many people, even physicians, are unfamiliar with EDS. So Legnini brings a binder explaining the illness whenever she goes to see a doctor.

There is no cure for EDS; however, patients can take medication to reduce their pain and lower their blood pressure. (High blood pressure is associated with the disease.)

Living with pain: ‘I see outside of my illness’

Because of the constant pain, Legnini often must gauge whether she is well enough to leave her bedroom. When the answer is no, she stays in her dorm and tries to get as much homework done as she can.

Walking, cooking and writing are things that many people take for granted. But for EDS patients, these tasks are not effortless. However, Legnini has found ways to overcome adversity.

She is enrolled in some online classes. Also, her older brother, Luciano Legnini, lives across the hall in VCU Globe and can assist her with everyday tasks, such as lifting heavy objects, grabbing items from a high shelf, cooking and cutting up food.

“She doesn’t want to portray herself as like this dependent,” Luciano Legnini said. “But I am here to help, and I am always willing to help her.”

Majesta-Doré Legnini begins each day with an elaborate morning routine. It starts with her cracking every joint in her body – a laborious process that alleviates some of the pain.

“I crack my back first, and then I move my knees and ankles so that they crack a little bit,” Legnini said. “I crack my toes, and then my hands just crack constantly.”

Then she stretches for 10 minutes, showers and wraps her knees, ankles, and shoulders in KT tape – a tape used for muscle, ligament and tendon pain relief and support. She gets dressed and grabs breakfast that meets her diet restrictions – gluten free, sugar free and dairy free – before heading out.

Legnini says it would be easy to play the victim and wallow in self-pity. She refuses to do so.

“I am not able to do some things,” she said. “And I know those things, and I don’t do those things. But I am able to learn.”

Legnini plans to get a joint degree between VCU and the University of Richmond with a master’s in health administration and a specialty in civil rights law. After college, she intends to advocate for inclusive and accessible health care.

Her goal is to ensure that people from all walks of life have access to the health care system. She won’t let her own disease define her.

“I see outside of my illness,” Legnini said. “But my illness is inside of everything I do. And so, the world is larger than my illness, but my illness is not larger than my world.”

Heavy Hauls Resume This Week

Heavy Hauls are scheduled to resume on Sunday, April 2nd 2017 at 10:00PM, weather permitting.

  • Monday, 4/3/2017
  • Tuesday, 4/4/2017
  • Monday, 4/10/2017
  • Tuesday, 4/11/2017
  • Wednesday, 4/12/2017
  • Thursday, 4/13/2017
  • Monday,  4/17/2017 
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