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Job Posting

Maintenance Worker

Job Posting #:  2018-1

Psychiatric residential treatment facility is seeking a full-time Maintenance Worker. Job duties include basic building and vehicle maintenance, performing equipment and building safety inspections, painting, plumbing, basic carpentry, electrical, & HVAC repair and installation.  Qualified candidates must possess the ability to work independently with little supervision while exhibiting quality workmanship. 

Formal experience in plumbing, electrical, carpentry, or HVAC is required.  Tradesman certification in one of the above listed trades is preferred.

Must possess the ability to frequently lift eighty pound objects.  Working conditions include work both indoors in climate controlled areas and outdoors in temperatures in excess of 90 degrees and in temperatures below 32 degrees.  Competitive pay & benefits including company sponsored 401(k) plan, health, life, dental, and vision insurance.  Post offer drug screen, physical, and criminal background screening required.  Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services is a Drug Free Work Place.  Position Open until filled.  EEO. 

Mail, fax, or e-mail cover letter and resume by February, 19, 2018 to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services

Attn: Chris Thompson

Job#:  2018-1

546 Walnut Grove Drive

Jarratt, Virginia 23867

Fax: (434) 634-6237

E-mail:  careers@jacksonfeild.org

Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Rural Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a psychiatric residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior, teaching life skills, administering a trauma informed behavioral support program, and leading youth in and participating in social, cultural, and recreational activities.  This position supervises youth in the residential unit and on off-campus activities and appointments.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, holidays, and nights.  Supreme flexibility required.  Seeking candidates with Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology, Sociology or other Human Services field.   Experience will be considered in lieu of a degree.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions open until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services

Attn: Chris Thompson

Job # 2018-2

E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

Career Opportunity

Melvin L. Davis Oil Company, Inc. is currently searching for Management Team Members.  We have openings from crew leaders all the way up to GM’s at various locations.  Our team has been the key to our success and growth so far and we’re looking for more people with the right skills and personality to join us.

Our Company:

The Davis family opened a small restaurant in rural Sussex County, Virginia in 1956. The entrepreneurial spirit continues today as the third generation has established two modern travel centers in Virginia, including one near the site of the original 15-employee restaurant. Today the company has expanded to more than 250 employees and serves professional drivers and traveling motorists along I-85 and I-95 in Virginia. In addition to the large, clean travel centers with food options in Stony Creek and Warfield, we also operate an Exxon service station and convenience store in Prince George, a Mobil service station and convenience store in Stony Creek, a Popeye’s, a Wendy’s and a Denny’s.  Our team has been the key to our success and growth so far and we’re looking for more people with the right skills and personality to join us.  Customer service is the foundation of our company, and it’s the job of every team member regardless of title.  Be a part of a talented team where you will be challenged each and every day.  We are a quickly growing company, and promote from within whenever possible.  Your opportunity for growth inside of our company is exciting.

Job Requirements:

•Minimum 1-3 years of leadership experience in the retail, grocery or other service industry with responsibility for financial results.

Benefits:

•Competitive Salary ranging from $28,000-$55,000.00 annually depending on experience plus 10% annual salary bonus potential paid quarterly for GM’s.

•Benefits that include a great medical package, dental insurance, vision insurance, life insurance, disability insurance and AFLAC.

•Paid Time Off.

•100% match of up to 4% of salary in the 401K plan.

•Discounts on fuel

•Discounted meals for employees on and off shift from 10% to 100% depending on position

Resumes can be sent to Jeanne Moseley at 434-246-2520 or jmoseley@dtc33.com or apply online at https://www.snagajob.com/job-search?ui=true&q=davis+travel+centers&w=23882

Margaret Ann Turner Conley

Margaret Ann Turner Conley, 76, of Kilmarnock, Virginia  passed away Tuesday, February 20, 2018.  She was born June 12, 1941 in Emporia, Virginia,  daughter to the late Joe Turner and Josephine Sopko Turner.  She retired after 20 years with VIMCO and enjoyed her retirement from gardening to traveling along with spending time with her children, grandchildren, family and friends.

She is preceded in death by her husband of 51 years, Samuel Roy Conley for whom she greatly missed.  She is survived by her two sons, David Lee Conley of Rockville, Va. and Jeffrey Scott Conley and wife Diana Lynn of Glen Allen, Va.; four grandchildren, Curtis Lee Conley and wife Laura, Lindsey Paige Conley, Jessica Blair Conley and Amber Lynn Conley and two great grandchildren Cason and Adalyn Conley as well as her two favorite grand dogs Gypsy and Panda.

Mass will be held 11:00 a. m. Monday, February 26, 2018 at St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church, Kilmarnock, Va.  Interment will follow the service at Morattico Baptist Church Cemetery, Kilmarnock, Va.  The family will receive friends 2:00 to 4:00 p. m. Sunday, February 25th at Currie Funeral Home, Kilmarnock, Va.

Margaret Lee Williams Edwards

Margaret Lee Williams Edwards of Greensville County, died February 19, 2018. She was the daughter of the late George Thomas Williams and Olive Rawlings Williams. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband Raymond Floyd Edwards; brother, Reeves Williams; three sisters, Frances Wagner, Ida Barnes, and Audrey Blalock.

She was a homemaker and lifetime member of Monumental United Methodist Church. “Maggie”, as she was called by her grandchildren and great grandchildren, was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, and sister. She is survived by two daughters, Merilyn E. Newsome (Wesley) of Roanoke Rapids, NC and Judy E. Rushing (Leon) of Cary, NC; sister, Agnes Murrill of Newport  News, VA; five grandchildren, Cynthia Browder, Ray Poole, Tripp Nunnally, Bryan Rushing, Megan Hare; and eight great grandchildren.

A service will be held at Monumental United Methodist Church on Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 2:00 P.M. with Rev. Rick Franklin and Rev. Rachel Plemmons officiating. Interment will follow at Emporia Cemetery. A reception will be held at the church one hour prior to the service.

The family would like to offer a special thanks to the staff of Greensville Manor.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Monumental United Methodist Church/Organ Fund.

Online condolences may be made at www.echolsfuneralhome.com.

KAINE CO-SPONSORS BIPARTISAN CHILDHOOD CANCER BILL

Bill complements Kaine’s Gabriella Miller Kids First Research Act to further expand pediatric cancer research and treatment 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Tim Kaine, a member of the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee, joined a bipartisan group of colleagues as a co-sponsor of the Childhood Cancer Survivorship, Treatment, Access, and Research (STAR) Act. This bipartisan legislation will advance pediatric cancer research and child-focused cancer treatments, while also improving childhood cancer surveillance and providing resources for survivors and those impacted by childhood cancer. 

“While we have made advances and breakthroughs in many fields, childhood cancer treatment has been left behind,” said Senator Kaine. "The Childhood Cancer STAR Act would help us right that wrong so one day we can ensure that no family has to lose a child to this terrible disease.” 

Childhood cancer research has progressed in recent years, but cancer is still the leading cause of death by disease past infancy among children in the United States, according to NIH’s National Cancer Institute (NCI). In 2017,  NCI estimated that nationwide, more than 10,000 children and adolescents up to 14 years of age would be diagnosed with cancer and that more than 1,190 would die from the disease.

Senator Kaine has consistently supported legislation funding pediatric cancer research. In 2014, he championed the bipartisan Gabriella Miller Kids First Research Act to support pediatric medical research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which passed Congress and was signed into law by President Obama. The legislation honors the memory of Leesburg, Virginia’s Gabriella Miller, who was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor the size of a walnut at age 9. He also voted for the RACE for Children Act of 2017 to support the development of innovative and promising cancer drugs for children.

The Childhood Cancer Survivorship, Treatment, Access, and Research (STAR) Act would:  

  • Expand opportunities for childhood cancer research
  • Improve efforts to identify and track childhood cancer incidences
  • Enhance the quality of life for childhood cancer survivors
  • Ensure pediatric expertise at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Expanding Opportunities for Childhood Cancer Research:  Due to the relatively small population of children with cancer and the geographic distance between these children, researching childhood cancer can be challenging.  The Childhood Cancer STAR Act would authorize the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to expand existing efforts to collect biospecimens for childhood cancer patients enrolled in NCI-sponsored clinical trials in order to maintain relevant clinical, biological, and demographic information on all children, adolescents, and young adults with cancer.

Improving Childhood Cancer Surveillance:  Building upon previous efforts, this bill would authorize grants to state cancer registries to identify and track incidences of child, adolescent, and young adult cancer.  This funding would be used to identify and train reporters of childhood cancer cases, secure infrastructure to ensure early the reporting and capture of child cancer incidences, and support the collection of cases into a national childhood cancer registry.

Improving Quality of Life for Childhood Cancer Survivors:  Unfortunately, even after beating cancer, as many as two-thirds of survivors suffer from late effects of their disease or treatment, including secondary cancers and organ damage. This legislation would enhance research on the late effects of childhood cancers, including a study on insurance coverage and payment of care for childhood cancer survivors; improve collaboration among providers so that doctors are better able to care for this population as they age; and establish a new pilot program to begin to explore innovative models of care for childhood cancer survivors. 

Ensuring Pediatric Expertise at the National Institutes of Health (NIH): The Childhood Cancer STAR Act would require the inclusion of at least one pediatric oncologist on the National Cancer Advisory Board and would improve childhood health reporting requirements to include pediatric cancer.

Exhibits Commemorating WW I Reflect Contemporary Concerns

WWI EXHIBIT

By Caitlin Barbieri, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Women across the country demanding equality. African Americans protesting racism. Government officials worried about Russian interference.

Those descriptions may reflect today’s headlines. But they also mirror what was happening a century ago – as America was coming out of World War I.

To commemorate the war’s centennial, the Virginia Museum of History and Culture is showcasing two exhibits – “WW1 America” and “The Commonwealth and the Great War.”

“WW1 America” is a traveling exhibit from the Minnesota Historical Society; Richmond is the exhibit’s only stop on the East Coast. “The Commonwealth and the Great War” was created by the Virginia Museum of History and Culture to highlight Virginians in the war.

“Every museum in the country has a collection of World War I posters,” said Brian Horrigan, curator of “WW1 America.”

“They’re beautiful, they’re brilliant, but they don’t tell the story. They tell a visual story of a story, a story about persuasion and propaganda, but where’s the underbelly of that story?”

Horrigan started the project three years ago with the desire to “look more broadly at America and Americans.” He wanted to focus less on the horrors of the trenches and propaganda and instead examine the turmoil at home.

“There were darker sides of the American experience during this time,” Horrigan said. “Entire swaths of U.S cities [were] engulfed in racial conflagrations; more race riots and more violent race riots [occurred] in 1919 than any single year in the 1960s.”

Just as the Black Lives Matter movement has pushed for societal reforms in recent years, African-Americans were fighting intense racism during World War I: The U.S. military then was segregated; blacks were relegated to menial jobs, and there were only two African-American combat units – both commanded by white officers. After the war, black soldiers returned to a segregated society; their heroism was ignored.

The exhibit also highlights issues of women’s suffrage – the #MeToo movement of its time – as well as workers’ rights and care for disabled veterans. In addition, during World War I, Americans were terrified of Russia, believing that the Bolsheviks were preparing to invade America. The exhibit shows how this fear developed into the Cold War.

Horrigan’s favorite part of the exhibit is a glass bowl used to pick men for the draft.

“The importance of this bowl as [a] national icon cannot be overstated,” Horrigan said. “I was fascinated by this draft bowl because I thought, there is a real turning-point moment where people began to feel that they are being counted, pinpointed and tracked by the United States government, and they could become just a number.”

Americans had never seen the government conduct such a massive call to arms. All men age 18 to 45 had to enter the draft. By the end of the war, nearly 20 percent of all draft-age men had served in the military.

The second exhibit, “The Commonwealth and the Great War,” focuses on the men drafted from Virginia and the families they left behind. Approximately 100,000 Virginians fought in World War I, and 3,700 died in service.

With the exception of Fort Myer and Fort A.P. Hill, all of Virginia’s major military bases were built during World War I. The exhibit includes pictures and stories from the men at these bases and highlights some of Virginia’s accomplished soldiers.

However, the exhibit honors more than Virginia’s soldiers. Pictures and artifacts reflect the significant role Virginia women played. Many women were nurses, helped organize fundraisers and made items to send to troops.

Horrigan said the Virginia Museum of History and Culture did an outstanding job complementing the traveling exhibit.

“What it has done with the second exhibit really makes this whole thing much more significant, giving it a personal Virginia side,” Horrigan said.

He also sees parallels between the museum’s contents and contemporary America.

“Every time you turn around in that exhibit, you see some connection to today,” Horrigan said.

If You Go

“WW1 America” will be on display at the Virginia Museum of History and Culture, 428 N. Boulevard in Richmond, until July 29. “The Commonwealth and the Great War” will be available until Nov. 18. Museum admission is $10.

Activists Oppose Drilling Off Virginia’s Coast

    

    

Business, military, fishing and environmental leaders unite at the Four Points hotel by the Sheraton Richmond Airport to publicly oppose allowing oil and gas development off of Virginia’s coast as the Trump Administration’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management holds one of its first public hearings in Richmond. This opposition is joined by growing bi-partisan calls from Virginia leaders, including Governor Ralph Northam, Senator Tim Kaine and Congressman Scott Taylor, to remove Virginia from this newly proposed oil and gas leasing program.

By Brandon Celentano, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — About 75 people, including activists and lawmakers, rallied Wednesday against the Trump administration’s plan to allow drilling off Virginia’s coast, saying it would endanger the environment, the economy and military readiness.

The group held a press conference before the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management’s public hearing in Richmond on the issue. At the meeting, environmental and business leaders urged the agency to abandon the plan.

“We are here today to protect our waters, the Virginia coast and Atlantic Ocean from dangerous oil and gas development,” said Karen Forget, executive director of Lynnhaven River Now in Virginia Beach. “We’re here to make our voices loud and clear that we do not think offshore drilling is good for Virginia.”

U.S. Rep. Donald McEachin, a Democrat representing Virginia’s 4th Congressional District, said he was honored to speak alongside state officials, environmentalists and retired military and business leaders to express opposition to offshore drilling.

“The Trump administration’s decision to push for drilling in more than 90 percent of our nation’s coastal waters, including off the coast of our beautiful commonwealth, poses serious dangers to our economy and our environment,” McEachin said. “As we learned from the Deepwater Horizon catastrophe, accidents can be unimaginably destructive, devastating the marine environment and potentially affecting the health of local residents.”

McEachin said an oil spill would have disastrous consequences for communities along the coast and around the Chesapeake Bay. Coastal fisheries, tourism and recreation support 91,000 jobs in Virginia and represent almost $5 billion of the state’s economy, he said.

Even without a spill, oil exploration alone would be damaging, according to Susan Barco, the research coordinator and senior scientist at the Virginia Aquarium and Marine Science Center in Virginia Beach.

“One of the tools they use is seismic testing, and that would occur regardless of if there is a spill or drilling for that matter,” Barco said. “Seismic testing produces very, very loud sounds in the ocean in order to understand what is below the strata or layers at the bottom of the ocean. Those sounds are very likely to negatively impact a lot of animals, particularly marine mammals.”

McEachin said the U.S. Defense Department has twice concluded that drilling off Virginia’s coast would compromise the Navy’s ability to effectively operate and train and that this would effectively reduce military readiness and compromise national security.

Gov. Ralph Northam and members of Congress from Virginia’s coastal areas, both Republicans and Democrats, oppose the U.S. Interior Department’s offshore drilling plan. Virginia Beach Mayor Will Sessoms, a Republican, alsoopposes it.

Wednesday’s meeting at a hotel near Richmond International Airport was the only public hearing that the federal government plans to hold in Virginia to discuss the offshore drilling plan. That irked Northam.

“If the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management doesn’t hold additional hearings in the Tidewater region, I will be one of the few people from a Virginia coastal community who has had the opportunity to share my opposition to the administration’s plan to put our economy, environment, national security, and the health and safety of our residents at risk,” Northam said.

The Democratic governor said he will use every tool he can use to make sure no drilling happens off Virginia’s coast.

Aubrey Neil Temple

Aubrey Neil Temple of Emporia, died February 20, 2018. He was the son of the late Johnnie Mercer Temple and Olivia Clyde Ferguson Temple. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife Sarah Klugel Temple.

He was the General Manager of Sadler Travel Plaza for 40 years and a member of Calvary Baptist Church. He is survived by two sons, Aubrey Neil Temple, Jr. (Nancy) of Emporia and Thomas M. Temple, Sr. of Emporia; brother, Glenn Temple (Arlene) of Valdosta, GA; four grandchildren, Thomas Mason Temple, Jr.(Amanda) of Emporia, Star Temple Nienaber (Brent) of Denver, CO, Nicholas Evan Temple (Margaret) of Emporia, and Jonathan Eli Temple (fiancé Brittanie Jones) of Emporia; seven great grandchildren, Cassidy, Nicholas, Gracey, Sarah Breelyn, Easton Neil, Naomi, and Eli.

A memorial service will be held at Calvary Baptist Church on Friday, February 23, 2018 at 1:00 P.M. with Rev. Andy Cain and Rev. Brad Barbour officiating. Family will receive visitors on Thursday, February 22, 2018 from 6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. at the residence of Aubrey Neil Temple, Jr., 312 Miles Circle, Emporia, VA 23847.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Greensville Volunteer Rescue Squad, 513 South Main Street, Emporia, VA.

Online condolences may be made at www.echolsfuneralhome.com.

Sherry Woodruff Gay

Sherry Woodruff Gay, 55, of Emporia, passed away Sunday, February 18, 2018. She was the daughter of the late Cecil and Lilly Woodruff. She is survived by her husband, William Richard Gay; son, Christopher Michael Gay and fiancée , Amanda Candice Harris; two grandsons, Christopher Michael Gay, Jr. and Jace Alexander Gay and a brother, Albert Cecil Woodruff, Jr. “Bo”.
The family will receive friends 1-2 p.m. Saturday, February 24 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd., Jarratt, Virginia. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be made to the funeral home to assist with final expenses. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

Comcast Completes Upgrades in Emporia

X1 On Demand: Browse thousands of On Demand TV shows, movies and more across X1

Recently Comcast custoemrs in Emporia got letters in the mail with news that we would all need to replace our cable boxes and cable modems. This letter was the first notice that long needed upgrades were coming to Emporia (and Greensville County)

It has been a few months since those letters were received, and all of us with Comcast service got to change the boxes. In that time you may have noticed new channels and services. If you opted to sign up for the HD package, you have noticed that there are many more choices there.

Comcast has completed the network enhancements and now offers an all-digital platform in Emporia.  Local residents now have access to more than 70 new HD channels (including all local broadcasters – WTVR/CBS HD, WRIC/ABC HD, WWBT/NBC HD, WRLH/FOX HD, WUPV/CW HD and WCVE/PBS HD – NBC Sports HD, ESPN HD, NFL Network HD, Bravo HD and HBO HD, among others); the latest selection of On Demand movies, TV shows and more; faster Internet speeds (the speed of Comcast’s popular Blast! internet service increased from 150 to 200 Mbps, at no additional cost); and Comcast’s X1 platform.

 

Voice Remote: Speak and see – we’re constantly adding new commands to the voice remote, include “Restart this program (if you happen to jump in during the middle of show or movie) and “what song is playing?” (X1 will analyze and provide artist/song names for any tune from a TV show, movie or even commercial)

X1 uses IP technology and the cloud to integrate the world’s largest collection of video with social media features and an expanding selection of interactive tailed-for-TV apps (Netflix, YouTube, Pandora,  iHeartRadio, Twitter, Facebook, sports, weather, traffic and more), as well as web content, smart search and voice technology and personalization tools – all in one easy-to-navigate, modern viewing experience.

Outside the home, Xfinity Internet customers have complimentary access to nearly 18 million Wi-Fi hotspots nationwide, including dozens of outdoor hotspots in the Emporia area along Main Street near shopping destinations and restaurants; at the Emporia Shopping Center; along Atlantic Street; and near the Greensville County High School.

“We are proud to continue investing in our network to bring our customers in Emporia more choice and more speed,” said Mary McLaughlin, Senior Vice President of Comcast’s Beltway Region.  “All of our services are designed to work together, making it easier than ever for our customers to stay connected to the things they love. Combined with our recent launches of Xfinity Mobile and Xfinity xFi, and our partnerships with Netflix, Pandora and You Tube on our X1 platform, we’re continuing to add significant value for customers across our product portfolio.”

YouTube on X1: Access to apps like YouTube, Netflix, iHeartRadio and Pandora right on X1.

Editor's Note: In the spirit of full disclosure, I have been a Comcast Customer since the company started operating in Emporia; before that, I was an Adelphia customer. I use my Comcast high speed internet to connect to the server where Emporia News is hosted. I also utilize the wi-fi hotspots, and can stay coneted to wi-fi on my phone along most of Main Street.

Joseph “Joe” McCrae Allen

Joseph “Joe” McCrae Allen of Emporia, died Sunday, February 18, 2018. He was born in Franklinton, N.C. and was the son of the late Archie Brown Allen and Cornelia Barbour Allen. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his first wife, Peggy Dutton Allen; two brothers, A.B. Allen and Bill Allen; and sister, Cornelia Allen Hite.

He was a retired supervisor at Weldon Mills. He is survived by his wife, Rachael Wall Allen; two daughters, Karen A. Epting (Patrick) of Trinity, FL, and Kelli A. Harrell (David) of Jarratt, VA; stepdaughter, Darlene Woodard (Dennis) of Branchville, VA; stepson, Bruce Acree (Sharon) of Jarratt, VA; six grandchildren, McCrae Bennett (Samantha) of Tampa, FL, Bryan Murphy, Jr.(Allyssa) of Gaston, NC, Keith Harrell of Jarratt, VA, Andrew Acree of Emporia, VA, Scott Acree of Jarratt, VA, and Austin Falwell of Emporia, VA; and great grandchild, Liam Murphy of Gaston, NC.

A memorial service will be held in the chapel of Echols Funeral Home on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at 6:30 P.M., with Pastor Troy Green of Grace Community Fellowship Church officiating. Family will receive visitors, following the service at daughter, Kelli A. Harrell’s residence, 11330 Henry Road, Jarratt, VA.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Grace Community Fellowship Church, 8014 Little Lowground Road, Emporia, VA 23847.

Online condolences may be made at www.echolsfuneralhome.com.

 

SVCC Welding Students Enjoy Learning

Two women, claiming each other as kin, take Southside Virginia Community College welding class together at the Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center in South Hill.  Heather McComb (Left to Right), John Evans, Instructor, and Diane Boaz make quite a team in the welding facility of SVCC in South Hill. 

With a total of three women currently enrolled in the Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center,  Southside Virginia Community College’s Arc Welding I class, intergenerational learning and nontraditional are not simply “buzzwords.”  SVCC instructor John Evans’ class at Lake Country Knowledge Center in South Hill notes that two of the women weld in booths side by side, but, in age, they are 50 years apart. 

These women enjoy learning together and supporting the efforts of one another.  And, it goes without saying that women enrolled in a welding class are not the norm.  Typically, one thinks of men as welders; and, women in this field are the minority.  But wearing their protective clothing of a cap, helmet, coat, gloves and boots, they fit right in.

Diane Boaz and Heather McComb are both from Lunenburg County.  Another interesting thing about Diane and Heather is that they are grandmother and granddaughter “by choice.”  They found each other when Heather and her family moved across the road from Diane several years ago.  From the beginning the two were of the same mind. Heather said, with emotion, that she wouldn’t be where she is today if it weren’t for Diane and her husband, David.

The Boaz’s have a farm where Diane has been actively working for some years.  Heather has helped with the cows and the farm duties.  For both of them, welding is something they can use to keep the equipment working and in good shape.  Heather will be graduating from high school in May and hopes to find work that offers a great deal of variety.  She knows she doesn’t want to sit behind a desk and really enjoys working outdoors. Ultimately her goal is to farm full-time. Her thinking is that welding skills will give her an employment edge.

A great deal of variety is what Diane has in her work history and a significant amount has been in work that is nontraditional for women.  She once applied for a position as fire fighter for the City of Charlotte, North Carolina.  Unfortunately, she was an inch too short to qualify, but she was the first woman to ever apply.  While her employment in a hospital operating room was more traditional, she was again in the minority as a Pinkerton Security Guard in Charlotte and as a member of a field surveying team in Mecklenburg County. 

Diane began welding in 2015 in two classes also at Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center.  She heard about the offering through Heather’s uncle and took the classes with him.  Heather came to observe.  By January 2018 Heather was enrolled as well and Diane signed up to hone her skills. 

Both women have high praises for Evans, “He is a wonderful, patient, kind person and a great instructor.”

For Diane Boaz, welding is more than just a skill to be used to maintain the tillage tools and other farm equipment.  “It means being more self-reliant and self-sufficient as a woman.”  And it certainly isn’t every woman who receives a Lincoln Stick Welder and a welding table as Christmas gifts from her husband!

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