The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services is experiencing phone problems and callers are not able to leave a voicemail.  Each hour our phone carrier expects to have the problem resolved; but, it is not resolved yet. 

For emergencies, call 434-634-2121

After 5:00 pm or for immediate assistance dial 911

To report child abuse or adult abuse please call the hotline at (800) 552-7096

Current Weather Conditions

 
Seven Day Forecast for Emporia, Virginia
 

Community Calendar Sponsored By...

Career Opportunity

Registered Nurse

Psychiatric residential treatment facility for boys & girls located fifteen minutes north of Emporia, Virginia seeks Virginia licensed RN.  This full-time position is required to work three 12 hour shifts per week.  Works every other weekend.  Available shift is 8 PM to 8 AM. 

A minimum of one year’s experience practicing as a RN required.  Experience in adolescent psychiatric setting preferred.  Competitive salary and benefits including employer sponsored health, dental, vision, and life insurance; and an employer matching 401(k) retirement plan.  Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services is an Equal Opportunity Employer & Drug Free Work Place.  Position open until filled.

E-mail, fax, or mail cover letter & resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services                                                                                           
2016-16
Attn: Chris Thompson
546 Walnut Grove Drive
Jarratt, Virginia 23867
E-mail: cthompson@jacksonfeild.org
Fax: (434) 634-6237



The last day for the CYC Pool will be Saturday August 27, 2016 from 2 to 7.  Admission and refreshments will be free.  Sponsored by CYC, Ltd Board and GCHS Class of 1985.

Click for Printable Coupon

City Council Hears Citizen Concerns About Water Quality

On Tuesday, August 23, the Emporia City Council held a special meeting to address area resident’s concerns about discolored water in their homes. Information provided to the Members of City Council for the meeting may be viewed here.

The meeting began with an explanation of how the water became discolored and what was being done to correct the issue.

Linwood Pope shared that the primary issue was the iron and manganese coming out of suspension, and that the treated water is crystal clear when it leaves the plant before adding that the issue was likely a result of the recent high temperatures and compounded by the many recent water main breaks.  Mr. Pope explained that the city had spoken with the State Health Department, explained the situation and what steps had been taken to correct the problem before assuring City Council that the Health Department has concurred with the Utility Department’s conclusion.  Mr. Pope further explained that in addition to the additional chlorine that was being used, flushing of the system should be the focus of the efforts to clarify the water.

This is not the first time that the City of Emporia has had this issue with the water, several years ago there was the same problem and it was caused by extreme heat.

Mr. Pope was joined by Tom Delbridge to explain the problem at the home of James Givens. The water in Mr. Givens’ home is extremely discolored.  Mr. Delbridge explained that samples had been taken from the fire hydrant on the street, at the water meter and inside the house.  The samples from the hydrant and water meter were clear, but the sample from inside the house was discolored.

A representative from the State Health Department, John Warwick, reinforced the comments offered by Pope and Delbridge, adding that running warm water through a cold pipe often causes certain minerals to come out of suspension.

While the water has been declared safe to drink, none of the members of the Utility Department present were willing to do so. As Mr. Warwick said later in the meeting, it is safe, but no one wants to drink water that is not clear.  Mr. Warwick also said that the Health Department believes that the City “has done what needs to be done to solve the problem.”

Samples of the water from Mr. Givens’ home were sent to the State Lab for testing, but the results will not be back until September.

After hearing that the lab results would not be back until September 5, Council Member Jay Ewing asked what was to be done now. Mr. Pope and Mr. Delbridge restated that the flushing of the system via fire hydrants would continue and cooler weather would help. The Utility Department has ordered automatic flushing devices for fire hydrants that can be programmed to automatically flush the system.

Several citizens were on hand for public comments.  James Givens spoke about the quality of the water in his home, adding that he must now buy bottled water in addition to paying a water bill. He took exception to some of the information laid out during the presentation, stating that utility crews flushed the hydrant at the end of Edgewood Street for over an hour and that the water still was brown. Mr. Givens further stated that the crews were at the water for 30 minutes before the water ran clear. At this time Mr. Givens also asked that those present drink the water, but no one would. Mr. Givens continued, “I heard the statement a few minutes ago that the water was safe to drink.  Here is my water from this morning; I would like to see you take a sip.” Neither Mr. Pope nor Mr. Delbridge would do so.

Mr. Givens told Council that he has heard differing reports and that Mr. Warwick had previously stated that the issue was bacteria in the pipes and that the Utility Department was saying something different. Mr. Warwick denies making that statement. Mr. Givens added that there was a problem somewhere in the system, but that he knew that it was not the pipes under his house.

Mr. Givens also stated that there were bound to be problems in a system this old, and that he “didn’t know that in 1910 that they even made metal pipes,” adding that he thought it would have been concrete, “and if it is concrete, what about asbestos?”

Mr. Givens concluded, “I just want my water clear. As it stands, I am spending $125 a month on my water bill” and an additional $35-40 to buy water to cook with and to drink; spending that additional money on water, he said, was not fair to him or his fellow citizens. Citing his health issues “The only thing I use this water for is to bathe, and that’s it.”

Mr. Givens also asked City Manager Brian Thrower “at your office, Mr. Thrower, how often to you drink this water?” As he asked this, it was difficult not to notice that Mr. Thrower, the City Attorney and all Members of City Council had bottled water in front of them.

After his comments, Mr. Givens was questioned by Mayor Mary Person about the need to purchase water, to which he answered that it was not fair to be forced to pay for something (City water) that cannot be used.

Peggy Branch also addressed City Council, asking if the City water is safe, “why does it carry an odor? Like a bathroom, not a chlorine odor. It’s not just the color, it’s the odor.” Ms. Branch referenced another citizen present, and he added his comments about the odor.

Chris Thompson told City Council about how the water leaves an odor on his dishes after being washed, either by hand or in the dishwasher.  He stated that the problem could not be galvanized pipe leading to his house as he had replaced the line from the meter to the house and had installed a new dishwasher. He added that it was embarrassing to have house guests and need to smell the plate to see if it could be eaten off of, describing the smell as wet dog fir.

Mr. Thompson added that these issues have been ongoing since before the new water treatment plant was built, and that once the new plant was done, the problems would go away. “My water bill is five times what it was” when he moved here. He stated that when he tried to get an abatement on his water bill that a City employee, and he named City Manager Brian Thrower as the employee, tell him that all he wanted “like everyone else is free water.” Mr. Thompson added that what he really wanted was clean, healthy water. He wondered why we did not call Virginia Tech, stating that they went to Flint, Michigan and adding that Mr. Warwick said that was not a scientist and we should get scientists to find and resolve the problem with our water.

Ms. Branch also shared the concern about the high water bills and asked if there would be some king of credit, adding that “we’re hearing about the flushing and flushing,” it’s costing us more to do that. She added that “we don’t want free water, we want what is right. We want the situation fixed, if it can be fixed.”

Theresa Johnson, of Chesterfield County, stated to Council that she was present to support family in the area, and that while she and her husband had considered retiring to Emporia, the water quality was an issue. She also wondered if the water was safe for her elderly, bedridden mother-in law. Mrs. Johnson told council that her daughter lived here and had complained about the smell of the water and asked if it was in the budget for the City to supply bottled water until the issue is fixed.

Both Jim Saunders and Kristin Vaughan shared that the water at the newly constructed YMCA was also discolored, and that it could not be the pipes in the building that were the problem as it is fairly new. The water at the drinking fountains and in the water closets at the YMCA is discolored. Mr. Saunders added that they were buying bottled water for the kids. Water is provided for two snacks daily, 160 bottles of water a day were being used. Mr. Saunders estimated that they may have purchased thousands of bottles of water, but they are not doing that now and that they were installing water filtration at the facility at a cost upwards of $1000.

Mr. Saunders applauded City Council for their efforts in replacing the water treatment plant, stating that the cost was $14 Million. He added that some water mains from the plant were replaces when it was built. “From where we were a few years ago, we have come a long way, but we still have a long way to go,” Mr. Saunders told Council.

“It’s not just affecting folks at home, but it is also affecting businesses,” Mr. Saunders continued, adding that the budget and financial questions for local businesses were something that Council would need to take into account when they reached a decision.

Mr. Saunders also reminded City Council that he had recently addressed them about the aging infrastructure within the City. While the water treatment plant is new, the main lines coming out of the plant were laid in 1910 and 1925.  He also added that this was not just a City of Emporia issue, or a State of Virginia problem, but that our “nation has an infrastructure problem, and it’s not sexy because it is underground. We are not the only city with 100 year old pipes.” He further stated that once this issue was fixed that we needed to develop a plan for addressing the infrastructure problems in the City. “It’s only good for us; it’s only good for our residents; it’s only good for our businesses. More importantly, in my mind, it is important for our children and future generations.”

Mrs. Vaughan stated that while she agreed with everything Mr. Saunders had said about the YMCA, she was speaking as a private citizen. She also cited her concerns over the many recent water main breaks in her neighborhood.  While she also agreed that the Utility Department was doing everything they could to correct the issues, she thought that the efforts were “temporary fixes. You can’t just spike our chlorine every time our water turns brown; I don’t think that is a long term solution.” Sharing her concern about the pipes, she said that she didn’t know of anything from 1910 or 1925 that was still functional. Speaking about the water treatment plant an analogy, she said “you can get a heart transplant, but if your arteries are clogged,” your blood is not going to flow through them and you’re going to have issues.  “To me, the pipes are the issue” she stated, while she urged Council to find a long term solution.

Mr. Thompson addressed Council again, applauding the Utility Department for their efforts thus far, adding “but we need to make absolutely sure that we are not poisoning our children. We need to know it.” Citing previous comments about chemical reactions and people from the Health Department were not scientists, he added that he was more afraid of things that he couldn’t see and shared his concern about the long term effects of the current water quality. He reiterated his question about bringing in Virginia Tech and that it would be nice to have some independent testing so that citizens could be reassured that the water was safe.

Mr. Thompson also shared his concern that with a water bill that is $140 a month that plates need to be smelled before they are used to eat off of. He added that during this last episode his children did not even want to bathe in the water as it looked like mud and he could not even see the bottom of the bath tub. He stated that the water sample brought in by Mr. Givens looked “great compared to what my water looks like.”

Addressing City Council about reported plans to build a new Municipal Building, he said that “you’ve got to take care of your water first,” and that before spending taxpayer money, infrastructure should come first.

After the public comments, Council discussed the issue, but the only action taken was to add this water issue to the agenda for the next meeting.

During the entire meeting, City Manager Brian Thrower remained mostly quiet. Several citizens observed his demeanor and commented that he seemed smug, disinterested and even scornful. During her public comment one citizen said, “Mr. Thrower, I know you’re tired and you’re bored, but this is important.”

New Cardiologist Joins VCU Health CMH

South Hill- Dr. Nimesh K. Patel recently joined the VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital team as a cardiologist at CMH Cardiology and Pulmonology.

Dr. N. Patel comes to VCU Health CMH with more than 14 years of professional training and 10 years of work experience. His most recent employment was as a clinical faculty member at The Commonwealth Medical College in Scranton, Pennsylvania. He has also completed professional training of Heart Failure and Transplant Fellowship at the University of Florida. He has procedural skills in Echocardiography, Nuclear Medicine, Cardiac CT, and Diagnostic Cardiac catheterization.

Dr. N. Patel received his MD in General Medicine at the Government Medical College in India, as well as a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine at The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education in Scranton, PA.  His certifications include:  The American Board of Internal Medicine, The American Board of Cardiology, The American Board of Echocardiography, The American Board of Nuclear Cardiology, The American Board of Hypertension and a Registered Physician in Vascular Interpretation (RPVI).

Dr. N. Patel is currently residing locally and said he is happy to live here and practice here to help the residents of our community.  His favorite hobbies include playing cricket, swimming and painting.

Dr. N. Patel is accepting new patients and referrals at CMH Cardiology and Pulmonology located at 200 East Ferrell Street in South Hill. To schedule an appointment, call (434) 447-2566.

2016 Brunswick Academy Fall Sports Teams

JV Volleyball team for Brunswick Academy for the 2016 Fall season.

Front Row:  All Captains (L-R): Sadler Lundy, Aaryn Babb, Naomi Sadler; Back Row:  (L-R):  Morgan Jamison, Sutton Montgomery, Alyssa Rivas, Darpan Jutela, Christian Williams, Austin Dornak, Kaitlyn Ottaway

2016 Varsity Football Team at Brunswick Academy.

First Row:  (L-R) Will Morris, Evan Abernathy, Drew Connell, Caleb Sasser, Jackson Combs, Ryan Powell; 2nd Row:  Sage Kallam, Davis Roberts, Kyle Tanner, Will Bryant, Kyle Branson, Reid Harrell, Nick Hobbs, Colin Washburn, Logan Rawlings; Back Row:  Bryant Poarch, Cole Moseley, Jackson Temple, Hunter Elliott, Chad Jones, Dawson Mitchell, Slayten Farmer, Adam Rutherford, Cole Bradley

SENIORS:  (L-R) Evan Abernathy, Hunter Elliott, Dawson Mitchell and Adam Rutherford

 

SVCC Recognizes Tobacco Commission Partnership

Southside Virginia Community College recently recognized the Virginia Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission as a partner that has been, and continues to be, instrumental in providing resources to students in the form of scholarships and in the development and expansion of programs.

In making the presentation, Dr. Al Roberts, SVCC President, said, “the college has a history of making the most out of our individual and community partnerships. It is how our institution has grown over the years and how we are better able to serve our communities and all residents of Southside Virginia. Tonight, the SVCC Local Board and the SVCC Foundation Board would like to recognize The Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission was created in 1999 by the Virginia General Assembly to promote growth and development in tobacco dependent communities.”

He noted that for over 15 years, SVCC and the communities served have partnered with the Commission. He said funds have assisted in the creation and development of many facilities and programs that are instrumental to SVCC. Centers, such as The Estes Community Center, the Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center, the Southern Virginia Higher Education Center, the Clarksville Enrichment Complex, the Southside Virginia Education Center, and the Occupational Technical Center, allow SVCC to offer classes and programs that make education and training accessible throughout the 4,200 square-mile footprint. The Commission partnered with the communities in the development of these state-of-the-art facilities.  Programs offered by SVCC have been established and expanded because of Commission funding. Nursing, Welding, Precision Machining, Automotive, Truck Driver Training, Diesel Technology, Information Technology, Emergency Medical Services are all included and, the list goes on and on! The Commission has supported programs to encourage and assist students to complete their GED. It has provided scholarship assistance to help hundreds of students in their quest for education and training.                                                       

SVCC’s grateful appreciation was expressed with the presentation of  a plaque that will be placed in the lobby of the Student Services and Learning Resource Center on the Daniel Campus.

Jacskon-Feild Homecoming

It’s time to start planning for this year’s “Homecoming”; so mark your calendars TODAY!

Let's face it...years are passing and our time is short; so please make every effort to attend this annual event. We’d love to see ALL our sisters from days gone by so make it a special afternoon to spend time with those who come to share and reminisce of memories as young girls at Jackson-Feild and check out our website at jacksonfeild.com!

We would love to see everyone, so please communicate with ANY sisters you may see or make contact with about our annual "Homecoming”.

It’s a time to celebrate and learn of our Legacy so please feel free to bring your family; spouses, children and grandchildren as well!

We would love to see EVERYONE attend this year, especially YOU…so please grace us with your presence!

"HOMECOMING" occurs every year...2nd Sunday of September..Mark your calendars NOW!  

Our event will be hosted at the on-site Community Building for Homecoming 2016!

Grace Church

9986 Purdy Road

Jarratt, Virginia 23867

September 11th

Noon 'til...

Bring a dish to pass and photos of the past!

SVCC Recognizes Employees for Years of Service

Southside Virginia Community College recently recognized Commonwealth of Virginia employees with Service Awards .  Nancy Turner of Kenbridge received her Thirty Year Award.  Brent Richey of South Hill (not pictured) received the Twenty Five Year Award.

Southside Virginia Community College recently recognized Commonwealth of Virginia employees with Service Awards .  Those receiving the Twenty Year Award are (Left to Right) Debra Andrews of Charlotte Court House, Matt Dunn of Keysville, Dr. Al Roberts of Emporia and Dr. Dixie Dalton of Kenbridge.  Not pictured is Duncan Quicke of Blackstone.

Southside Virginia Community College recently recognized Commonwealth of Virginia employees with Service Awards .  Those receiving the Fifteen Year Award are (Left to Right) Marysue Lewis of South Hill, Tim Jenkins of Kenbridge, Sharon Freeman of Lawrenceville and Stephen Capon of Keysville.  Not pictured are Mary Elkins, Teresa George, Mike King, Gunay Smith.

Southside Virginia Community College recently recognized Commonwealth of Virginia employees with Service Awards .  Those receiving the Ten Year Award are (Left to Right) Terri Milroy of Midlothian, Christy Lowery-Carter of South Boston, Janet Lenhart of Chase City, Stacy Hines-Bentley of Lynchburg, John Hays of Ashland and Alfonzo Seward of Lawrenceville.  Not picured is Christopher Dickerson.

Southside Virginia Community College recently recognized Commonwealth of Virginia employees with Service Awards .  Those receiving the Five Year Award are (Left to Right) Patricia Archer of Kenbridge, Mashonda Macklin of Lawrenceville, Bobby Lester of South Hill and William McGraw of Blackstone.  Not pictured is Pamela Taylor of Clarksville.  

"It's Our Job"

Remember not so long ago
Of the cold weather we complained
Yes and then it started again
When it seemed it always rained.
 
Well you can still hear those voices
If you stand in the right spot
Once again the weather has changed
and for most it is too hot.
 
We can talk about the weather
Though there's not much we can do
It's just "Mother Natures" way of trying
To please both me and you.
 
Now the weather makes one change their plans
Upon any given day
Yet it's something you must deal with
When you're on vacation far away.
 
Yes it's our job to complain
And we do it very well
Still when our favorite will come around
It's much too hard to tell.
 
Accept it as it is each day
Knowing that it soon could change
then perhaps it will be what you want
For the weather can be strange.
 
Roy E. Schepp

Jackson-Feild Promotes Gary Bryant to Residential Supervisor

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services (JFBHS) is pleased to announce that Gary Bryant has been promoted to the position of Residential Supervisor of Darden Cottage where he had been serving as a residential counselor.

In his new position, Bryant will be responsible for the daily operations of Darden Cottage and supervise the residents and staff of the cottage. He will be responsible for the implementation of curriculums and help with the development of new program initiatives.  He also will be responsible for ensuring that Darden Cottage operations comply with licensing and certification standards

He has worked in the field of children’s services and mental health since 1993. He has been on the staff at Jackson-Feild since 2010.

Mr. Bryant, a native of New Bern NC, is attending Southside Virginia Community College working toward his degree in human services.  Additionally, he is an intern with the North Carolina Substance Abuse Practice Board. Mr. Bryant is a youth pastor at First Anointed Christian Assembly in Lawrenceville VA.

He is the proud father of two grown children:  a son who works for a general contractor in Georgia, and a daughter serving in the United States Army.

Jackson-Feild congratulates Gary Bryant and thanks him for his dedication to all that he does both for JFBHS as well as for his community.

Drs. Gilbert and Tillar to Retire

Dr. Lowell H Gilbert, Optometrist and Dr. William T Tillar III, Optometrist are retiring due to health reasons and closing their practice and office in Emporia. It has been our pleasure serving this community. We sincerely appreciate your business..

Patient records will be available at Emporia Office at 508 Belfield Dr, Emporia, VA  until September 12, 2016.  434-634-5195.

After September 12th the records will be available at the office of Drs Gilbert and Farley, OD PC 3731 Boulevard, Colonial Heights, VA 804-526-3676

SVCC Pins Nurses at Christianna Campus

Christanna Campus of Southside Virginia Community College celebrated a Pinning Ceremony for Practical Nursing students successfully completing the program.  The students are (Left to Right): Jaquell Wilson from Prince George, Brandi Harrell from South Hill, Ashley Sadler from Brodnax, Brittany Cross from South Hill,  Cynthia Wilson from Emporia, Nickie Ervin from Fort Lee, Mandi Egnor from Dinwiddie, and  Lauren Upton from Dinwiddie.

So Many Choices

By Dr. Al Roberts

The Model T was America’s first automobile priced for the middle class. In writing about it, industrialist Henry Ford quipped, “Any customer can have a car painted any color that he wants so long as it is black.”

Not all early cars were black. Cars built by craftsmen—and even some of the first production models of the Model T—sported different colors. The switch to all-black was made to accommodate nascent assembly lines and to overcome technical problems related to paints. The one-color-fits-all approach didn’t last long.

After the end of World War I, improvements in painting technologies opened the way for car manufacturers to offer a variety of colors. By 1926, even Henry Ford found himself bowing to customer demand and offering more choices.

It seems that in every area of human endeavor, individual needs based on unique circumstances call for customize solutions.

This is especially evident in education. Students come from diverse walks of life. They face multi-faceted challenges. Daily, they juggle numerous obligations, and each faces different sets of complications and worries.

For this reason, Southside Virginia Community College offers courses in a variety of places and with a wide array of scheduling options. SVCC serves students from more than seven different physical sites across its service area. Classes include those taught in traditional 16-week semesters, but others are available in shorter formats of twelve, ten, eight, five, or even four weeks. Some classes are held during the day; others meet at night.

And, just as improvements in painting technologies ushered in a rainbow of car color choices, the present internet age has introduced a host of new technologies for teaching. SVCC makes full use of these state-of-the-art developments to offer classes in a wide variety of formats, including online, hybrid, compressed video, and shared distance learning courses. Online course can be completed from anywhere with a computer and a reliable internet connection. Hybrid courses combine the benefits of seated and online components. Compressed video technology makes courses available at more locations by enabling instructors and students to connect with two-way communication tools. Furthermore, shared distance learning lets SVCC students broaden their online class choices to include offerings from other partner institutions.

So many choices! Yet, not every choice is right for every person. At SVCC, counselors work with each individual to customize a roadmap to success. This dedication to personalized assistance helps ensure that every individual finds just the right mix of class schedules, formats, and locations to successfully reach his or her chosen destination.

If you’re ready to start or to continue on an education journey, call 888-220-7822 or visit www.southside.edu for assistance in choosing the right education model for your lifestyle.

Dr. Al Roberts is president of Southside Virginia Community College, an institution of higher learning that provides a wide variety of education opportunities to a diverse student population within a service area that spans ten counties and the city of Emporia. He can be reached via email at al.roberts@southside.edu.

Save the date! Statewide Disaster Drills

2016 Southeast ShakeOut
Millions of people will join and practice how to Drop, Cover and Hold On during the 2016 Southeast ShakeOut Earthquake Drill on October 20 at 10:20 a.m. Online registration is open on this link: http://www.shakeout.org/southeast/register/ If you have questions about the ShakeOut, please call or write to VDEM external affairs team at (804) 897-6510 or pio@vdem.virginia.gov .

2017 Statewide Tornado Drill
The annual Statewide Tornado Drill will take place Tuesday, March 21, 2017, at 9:45 a.m.  The date will be observed as Tornado Preparedness Day.  (If widespread severe weather threatens the commonwealth on that date, then the drill will be rescheduled for Wednesday, March 22, at 9:45 a.m.)
 
In 2016, Virginia was hit by the deadliest tornado event since 1959, resulting in five fatalities and more than 45 injuries. An EF-1 tornado touched down on the Town of Waverly in Sussex County, an EF-3 tornado affected Appomattox County and another EF-3 tornado hit the Middle Peninsula and Northern Neck region. The National Weather Service (NWS) verified that a total of eight tornadoes impacting twelve localities in Virginia during that storm.
Online registration for the drill is not yet open, but the Virginia Department of Emergency Management advises us that registration should be up by mid October at www.vaemergency.gov so check the site then.  
If you have questions about Tornado Preparedness Day or the statewide drill, please call or write to VDEM external affairs team at (804) 897-6510 or pio@vdem.virginia.gov . 

Kids Kab Kommunity Kickback Planned

Southampton County.  On August 27 from 1 -7 pm the Kids Kab community organization will host a free Kommunity Kickback event at the Boykins Community Park in Boykins, VA.

The purpose of the Kommunity Kickback Is to provide activities for children and families in a positive atmosphere, raise awareness about Kids Kab services and programming and raise money for the organization through donations. The Kickback will encourage physical activity with a 3-Point Shootout, Around the World Shooting Contest, Free-Throw Contest, Tennis Ball Toss, 40-yard dash and will end with a kickball game. Children may also participate in bounce houses provided by Spacewalk of Suffolk. Free concessions will include hot dogs and hamburgers, waters, Gatorades, juice boxes and healthy choice baked chips. At the end of the event each child will receive a bag of school supplies to include pens, pencils, highlighters, erasers, and more. “It is my goal to keep kids mobile and motivated,” said Charles Cooper, Executive Director, “free school supplies and physical activity are two ways that we can do that.”

Donations will be accepted at the gate and Kids Kab t-shirts will be available for purchase. Local churches are providing donations of concession items. The organization is accepting school supplies donations as well. More information is available by emailing info@kidskab.org. To learn more about Kids Kab, please visit www.kidskab.org.

INSTALLATION OF CONCRETE BARRIER WALLS ON I-95 Bridge Replacement PROJECT over the Meherrin River

Scheduled lane closures to start next week

EMPORIA – Crews with the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) have scheduled road work southbound on I-95 over the Meherrin River. For the next two weeks, beginning Sunday, June 12, 2016, until Friday June 24, 2016 crews will begin the installation of the concrete barrier walls. Traffic will be reduced to single-lane closures north of the Exit 11 (Route 58)ramp. This single-lane closure will start Sundays beginning at 6:30 p.m. and extend until Fridays at 5 a.m. No work will take place on weekends. Portable changeable message signs are in place to alert motorists of the single-lane closures. 

The I-95 Bridge Replacement Project has been underway since January 2016 and is scheduled for completion in October 2019. The project will replace the two bridges, to include realignment of the south bridge and installation of storm water facilities.  All construction work is dependent upon weather conditions. Please drive with caution at all times through the work zone.

During construction there will be intermittent traffic shifts and single-lane closures throughout the duration of the project. For the majority of the project, two lanes of traffic will be maintained. To learn more, please visit http://www.virginiadot.org/projects/hamptonroads/i95_bridge_replacement.asp

Motorists are encouraged to visit www.va511.org, call 511, listen to Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) 1680 AM or call the Traffic Information Line at 757-361-3016 for current traffic and travel information. 

VDOT URGES MOTORISTS TO OBEY ROUTE 301 BRIDGE TRAFFIC AND DETOUR SIGNS

Virginia State Police to begin enforcement for reckless driving.

GREENSVILLE COUNTY – Safety is the biggest priority for the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT), and the Hampton Roads District is urging motorists to obey all traffic and detour signs posted around the Route 301 Southbound Bridge Replacement Project in Greensville County.  Recently, drivers have been observed traveling the wrong way over the Route 301 Northbound Bridge to avoid the construction detour, resulting in several near-collisions.

Beginning today, January 4, 2016, Virginia State Police will step up enforcement near the bridge and issue reckless driving citations to motorists exhibiting dangerous driving patterns.  Drivers traveling southbound will use I-95 as the detour around the bridge closure.

The Route 301 Bridge Replacement Project is currently on schedule for completion in summer 2017.  The old bridge has been demolished, and crews are currently working on building the new bridge approaches.   For more information, please visit VDOT’s project website:

http://www.virginiadot.org/projects/hamptonroads/rte_301_bridge.asp

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