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Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

 

Job#: 2017-10

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Rural Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a psychiatric residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior, teaching life skills, administering a trauma informed behavioral support program, and leading youth in and participating in social, cultural, and recreational activities.  This position supervises youth in the residential unit and on off-campus activities and appointments.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, holidays, and nights.  Supreme flexibility required. 

Seeking candidates with Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology, Sociology or other Human Services field.   Experience will be considered in lieu of a degree.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions opened until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Chris Thompson
Job # 2017-10
E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

This Paid Political Advertisement does not represent an endorsement by Emporia News. Emporia News does not endorse candidates for any political office.

Skip the Mall! Shop Local and Support Small Businesses on Saturday

The first Thanksgiving Feast was celebrated in the Plymouth Colony. When the “Pilgrims” arrived, they spent the first winter aboard the Mayflower.  It had been a rough first year for that group. Nearly half of the group never made it to that first spring. As you can imagine, all of those people living aboard a ship moored in the Massachusetts Bay with not a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables, both exposure and scurvy were pretty major threats. Infectious diseases were also rampant in such an overcrowded space.

When spring finally came and the survivors of the winter started the process of building the colony, they were met by a Native Abenaki who actually greeted them in English. He returned with another Native, Squanto, a Pawtuxet tribesman who had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to the metropolis of London and making his way back to his own continent.

Thankfully for the new arrivals, Squanto harbored no ill will to the English. He could have easily seen the Mayflower Colonists as an enemy and wiped them all out. Instead, he taught them to grow their own food and introduced the colonists to the Wampanoag Tribe that was the beginning of an alliance that would last for more than 5 decades.

The crops that Squanto taught the fledgling colony to grow brought in a bountiful harvest. The harvest feast that, along with many other feasts, grew into our modern Thanksgiving was called by the Governor of the Plymouth Colony, William Bradford. That feast lasted three days and included Lobsters and Swans. The Wampanoag brought at least 5 deer that were roasted. Turkey was also plentiful and a major source of food for both Natives and colonists. The corn that was already a staple of the Natives was served in a dish that is closer to polenta than the modern Corn pudding. Local produce, most likely, played a major role in that first feast. The first pumpkin pie was probably a bit different than what we do today. Without wheat and sugar, pumpkin flavored custard in short-crust would not have been possible, even if there were an oven in the colony. Food historians believe that the first “pumpkin pie” was a mixture of milk and honey poured into a hollowed out pumpkin and roasted in the coals. Other sweets were also close at hand – the plentiful fruits that were native to the area.

I will admit that I am a bit biased when it comes to when the first Thanksgiving was, as Governor William Bradford was my first ancestor on this great continent. No matter what anybody believes about the origins of this uniquely American holiday, that first feast was completely local. The Turkeys, Seals, Mussels, Lobster, Onions, Turnips, Blueberries and the Pumpkins were all readily available and plentiful. Those early colonists couldn’t just jump in the family car and head into Colonial Heights to buy their groceries. They ate what was close. They ate what they could catch within walking distance of their colony.

We could take a page from Governor Bradford’s playbook when it comes to buying gifts for Christmas (which was actually illegal in Puritan New England for quite a while).

You could, of course, hop in the family car and drive to any one of the major shopping centers in the region, raising your blood pressure in the process, or you could spend all day Thursday and as much time as you want to (or are forced to) on Friday with your family and friends.

As the example of that first Harvest Feast teaches us, local is best, and we have a bountiful selection of quality retailers right here in Emporia-Greensville.

Surely you have will have some leftover country ham from Spivey’s, so make it the centerpiece of a hearty Saturday breakfast. Spivey’s does have the best meat department in town, so you could also get some quality bacon and sausage. Whip up some simple homemade biscuits (or not), fry up some home fries and scramble some eggs. Enjoy a leisurely breakfast with your spouse and children (and possibly your in-laws, cousins, aunts or uncles that are still visiting).

After breakfast get out the walking shoes and take advantage of the many local businesses that are truly the lifeblood of our local economy:

Carolyn's Creations, 1363 Brink Road (pictured above), has an amazing selection of unique gifts and Christmas Decorations.  This weekend, Carolyn is running a sale on ornaments and stems to decorate your home for the holidays.  Carolyn also offers you a perfect opportunity to find truly thoughtful gifts like Jim Shore ornaments, Tervis Tumblers, Jewelry, and a ton of other one of a kind things for the home. 

CJ's Furniture and Pawn Shop, 308 South Main Street.  Pawn Shops are great sources for gifts for the entire family, electronics, tools, jewelry, firearms, and even furniture.  CJs has a truly unique selection of merchandise – from inkwells and antique lighters and ink pens, they even have a really sweet Milk Glass cookie jar among their varied and interesting, well, stuff. Compact Discs for the music lover, DVDs for the movie lover, games and consoles, and did I mention that they have jewelry? This month Computers and Mattresses are on sale.

Just like pawn shops, consignment shops have a pretty good selection of unique gifts. Check out Halifax Street for Twice Told Tales & Treasures and True Patriot Antiques at 327 and 323, respectively

At Twice Told Treasures, Leandra has a whole shelves of scrap booking and paper craft items and a table full of fun salt and pepper shakers. She also has a wall full of used books that need an new home.

A recent trip to True Patriot Antiques found a new home for a ceramic bread box, but there is also a table full of glassware (including Fostoria American) and some other pretty neat stuff, like a set of canisters – white with blue writing and a fun shape.

While you are on Halifax Street, stop by Three Bears and a Tree at 321. They have a Day Spa, gift shop and are the home of L. P.’s Café Cusine. After you shop a bit, let Linda whip you up a great lunch. I was there one day last week and the Meatloaf Sandwich that was the special that day was great.

I know that hardware stores are not typically hot spots for traditional gift shopping. We all have that one person in our life that is a bit of a nerd about something. Maybe someone has been dropping hints about a new dishwasher or freezer or washing machine (yes, I know, all of these involve work, but if your spouse actually asks for a dishwasher, buy them a dishwasher, just make sure that they are serious so that you don’t end up in the dog house), stop by City Auto Supply and Hardware at 311 and have a look.

If you don’t find that perfect gift that is actually work at City Auto Supply, stop by Farm and Lawn Service, head on over to Farm and Lawn Service, 700 North Main Street, and check out their line of Husqvarna tools.  Beat the spring rush and get Dad that new String Trimmer or Leaf Blower for Christmas (you know that he has been dropping hints all year).

Since you are already so close, stop by Monte’s Flower and Gift Shop, 600 North Main Street.  Flowers are always a good choice, but they have more than flowers and potted plants. Check out their selection of gifts and Christmas Ornaments.

Also in the Emporia Shopping Center isSloan's Boutique, 528 North Main Street.  Sloan's offers unique fashions for men and women.

For over 50 years, White’s Family Shoe Store, 212 East Cloverleaf Drive, has been offering the quality name brands that you would drive to some other place to buy. Save the drive, you can get gifts for everybody right here in Emporia at White’s Family Shoe Store.

Head on over to Jarrat and check out Vintage, 117 Jarratt Avenue. If they still have it, there is a great doll house that would make almost any little girl happy.  They also have antiques and handcrafted furniture and gifts. Many of the offerings, from butcher block cutting boards to candy, including some truly addictive candied pecans, and soy candles are made by local artisans. There really too many items to list, so just head on over and have a look for yourself!

Back to Emporia, where you must swing by Thorpe’s Whole Home Store, 202 Carroll Street (in the old Sash and Door).  Yes, they have flooring and paint (think about updating the bathroom for Mom), but if you head upstairs there is a world more. Melody pointed out the custom embroidery on my last visit, and they have seasonal soaps, some great smelling Woodwick Candles and a corner chock full of fishing tackle, which could make at least one grandparent, uncle brother or sister happy.

On the off chance that you still have not found everything for everyone on your list, there is also Clements Mayes Photographyand Picture Perfect Custom Framing, 401 Halifax Street. Grandmas the world over are always happy to get pictures of their babies! In addition to the great photography, Clements also does wonderful restoration work, so you can get that picture that you knocked off the wall a few years ago restored and reframed.

Dinnertime is near! Arby’s, 109 Market Drive, has some great new menu items. The Pork Belly is back! Swing by, get dinner for the car full of weary shoppers – get dessert, too, the turnovers and cookies are as good as the milk shakes.

Odds are, you have forgotten someone or have gifts going out of town. You might even have someone that would love a taste of home. The Good Earth Peanut Company, 5334 Skippers Rd, Skippers, has you covered. They can even handle the shipping. No, it is not all peanuts, but, honestly, a good tin of peanuts can’t be beat. They have trail mixes, gift assortments, mixed nuts, butter toasted peanuts and pecans, preserves, pickles, apple butter (and pumpkin, peach, and cherry), peanut butter, honey, salad dressings, sauces and Country Ham. If you are just too tuckered out to head down to Skippers, visit http://www.goodearthpeanuts.com/.

Take it easy on Friday and shop local on Saturday. Tell them you read about it on EmporiaNews.com!

Open House At CITE Lab on November 30, 2017

The public is invited to an Open House at the Center for Information Technology Excellence (CITE) Lab located at the Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center in South Hill.  Open House is Thursday November 30, 2017 anytime from 5 to 7 p.m. at 118 East Danville Street. 

Come learn about the program and meet some of our students who are currentlypreparing for exciting careers in the Information Technology world. The lab offers students realistic learning experiences in a simulated data center environment and prepares them to take CompTia credentials (A+, Server+, Network+,Security+), industry standards.

Made possible through a grant from the Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission and a partnership with the Town of South Hill, the lab has been built and furnished to provide a state-of-the-art laboratory in which students will learn and hone the skills for jobs in IT.  This field encompassesthe application of computer to store, study, retrieve, transmit, and manipulate data or information, often in the context of a business or other enterprise.

For information, call 434 955 2252.

Francis “Buddy” Harding

Francis “Buddy” Harding, 87, of Jarratt, passed away Sunday, November 19, 2017.  He is survived by his wife, Esther “Tutter” Harding; three daughters, Denice Cifers and husband, Wayne, Karen Wiles and Sheran Rigg and husband, Baker; twelve grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; nephew, Kevin Harding and nieces, Tammy Cabrera, Virginia Anderson and Kathleen Meehan. A memorial service will be held 3 p.m. Saturday, November 25 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd., Jarratt, Virginia where the family will receive friends one hour prior to the service. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

"Give Thanks"

Be thanksful for your blessings
As you count them one by one
It will be quite off believe me
If you find that you have none.
 
Some have many, some have less
Though I feel you'll find it true
You have things for to be thankful
That you mighe never knew.
 
You have the freedom for to travel
And peace which does protect
There are friends and neighbors down the street
That treat you with respect.
 
Being rich or poor doesn't determine
The quality of ones life
It's the love of your children and grandchildren
Your husband or your wife.
 
There are times that you will hunger
And others your cup will overflow
Thank the lord that you're still living
For the ending se don't know.
 
Take the time on this Thanksgiving
For to do a quick review
Find the thanks in the life you're living
And may God bless all of you.
 
-Roy E. Schepp

VIRGINIA STATE POLICE URGES MOTORISTS TO DRIVE TO SAVE LIVES THIS THANKSGIVING WEEKEND

RICHMOND – Traveling to spend time with family is a holiday tradition, and as millions hit the road this Thanksgiving, Virginia State Police urges motorists to drive to save lives so everyone arrives safely for the celebration.

Within the past two weeks, traffic crashes in Virginia have claimed the lives of 35 drivers and passengers, and nine pedestrians. From Jan. 1, 2017, to Nov. 16, 2017, preliminary reports indicate traffic crashes statewide have resulted in 710 deaths; compared to 640 deaths during the same timeframe in 2016.

“Tragically, traffic fatalities are on the rise in Virginia,” said Colonel W. Steven Flaherty, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “We’ve seen an 11 percent increase over this time last year. With so many people estimated to travel over the Thanksgiving weekend, we need everyone to help prevent crashes by driving smart, buckling up and never driving drunk or drugged. We want everyone to arrive alive and enjoy the holiday.”

To help prevent traffic deaths and injuries during the Thanksgiving holiday, the Virginia State Police will once again be participating in Operation C.A.R.E., an acronym for the Combined Accident Reduction Effort. Operation C.A.R.E. is a state-sponsored, national program designed to reduce crashes, fatalities and injuries caused by speeding, impaired driving and failure to use occupant restraints. As a participating agency, state police will increase its visibility and traffic enforcement efforts throughout the Commonwealth beginning Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017, at 12:01 a.m. and continuing through midnight, Sunday, Nov. 26, 2017.

During last year’s Thanksgiving weekend, Virginia State Police troopers:

  • Cited 9,235 speeders
  • Cited 2,928 reckless drivers
  • Arrested 132 drunken drivers
  • Cited 824 safety belt violations & 286 child restraint violations
  • Investigated 1,163 traffic crashes, in which eight were fatal

With additional troopers and other law enforcement working on Virginia’s highways this holiday weekend, Virginia State Police also reminds drivers to comply with Virginia’s “Move Over” law. A life-saving law intended to protect public safety responders and others who have a responsibility to work the roads. Drivers are required to change to another travel lane or, when unable to, to cautiously pass emergency personnel stopped on the side of the road. The law also includes highway maintenance vehicles and tow trucks equipped with flashing amber lights.

Enfield NC Home Tour is December 2 - The Craftsman Homes

         

Downtown Enfield Restoration & Preservation (DERP) is holding its Fifth Annual Christmas Homes Tour on Saturday, December 2. The tour is designed to showcase the architecture of this historic town (founded in 1740). Since so many newcomers have discovered the advantages of living in this sleepy, rural town – people from New Hampshire, Arizona, New Jersey, Long Island, Florida and Indiana – the tour will provide a good opportunity to see what some of these newcomers have been up to in their new town and restoration projects.

In years past, the Christmas Homes Tour has featured several antebellum homes in Enfield – Shell Castle, the Cellars, the James H. Parker House, Strawberry Hill and Myrtle Lawn – all of which are on the National Register of Historic Places. These homes were built to inspire and impress – with their floor-to-ceiling windows, imposing staircases, double-door entrances, historic out buildings and formal gardens. The 2017 Christmas Homes Tour is veering in a new direction; this year the tour will feature a homier style: the Craftsmen Bungalow.

The Craftsman style was inspired by the 1850s arts and crafts movement in England. In recent years, the Craftsman style bungalow has regained its popularity. These homes have strong bones, natural materials, handcrafted, built-in cabinetry, big covered porches with tapered (battered) columns on heavy piers that integrate the outside environment with the inside floor plan, deep eaves with knee braces and low-pitched roofs, high ceilings, plenty of double-hung windows and meandering floor plans – with the era of construction being roughly from 1920 to 1930.

What distinguishes the Craftsmen Bungalows on Enfield’s 2017 Christmas Homes Tour? For one thing, the featured homes on the 2017 Christmas Homes Tour are not “kit homes.” Current restoration undertaken by the new owners in Enfield would have revealed several distinctive features of the “kit homes,” such as stamped lumber, Goodwall Sheet Plaster, a square block on molding joints at staircase landings and shipping labels under the staircase.In contrast, the homes on this year’s tour all have plaster walls, indigenous wood, built-in cabinetry and atypical dimensions.

The 2017 Christmas Homes Tour will feature five Craftsman Bungalows along with one “Special Project” – a turn-of-the-century warehouse built in 1919 recently converted into living space, which was singlehandedly designed and built by one of Enfield’s newer residents, Lee Jones. The exposed beams, brick arches, stain glass, heated flooring and open design are all reminiscent of Craftsman design elements but now have an up-to-date twist in this spacious warehouse.

To learn more about Craftsman style, Maggie Gregg, Regional Director, Eastern Office of Preservation North Carolina, will give a lecture on December 2 at 11 a.m. at Bellamy Manor & Gardens. Gregg, who has a “lifelong love of preservation,” was one of the first graduates of Edgecombe Community College’s Historic Preservation Technology Program. The lecture will last an hour.

The tour begins at noon and ends at 5 p.m. Tickets ($25) are available at Aunt Ruby's Peanuts prior to the date of the event. A senior discount ($20) will be given to those who purchase tickets at Bellamy Manor on the day-of-the-event, at 613 Glenview Road, Enfield, where the lecture is taking place. Please arrive at 10:30 a.m. so you can purchase tickets and hear the 11 a.m. lecture. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.derpserves.org.

An evening prayer service will be held at the Historic Episcopal Church of the Advent, 200 Batchelor Avenue, on Saturday, December 2, 5:30. A Community Choir, with organist Sally Mosely and Choir Director Jesse Shearin, will perform during the service. If you plan to stay the weekend in Enfield, the annual Christmas service at Whitaker’s Chapel, a Heritage Landmark of the United Methodist Church and also on the National Register of Historic Places, will be held the following day, Sunday, December 3, at 3 p.m. This year Whitaker’s Chapel will be celebrating its 277th anniversary.

The Downtown Enfield Restoration and Preservation Association (DERP) is a non-profit membership organization comprised of business owners and citizens to strengthen and support downtown revitalization. The organization’s primary focus is stabilization of existing infrastructure, revitalization of abandoned properties through redevelopment, promote Enfield’s natural eco-agri-cultural tourism opportunities and to develop and publish resources and economic incentives to attract and retain business in Downtown Enfield. DERP supports Enfield, “American Made Since 1740.” This past year, DERP has planted 17 Crepe Myrtle trees in the downtown area, installed four new awnings on downtown store fronts and commissioned  Napoleon Hill to restore a mural on a Dennis Street building. For more information about the house tour or the day’s events or DERP, contact Suzann McKiernan Anderson at 252-445-2234.

PHOTO CREDIT: Susanna Martin

2017 Christmas Concert

Pictured: Tammy Hand, Wendy Keener, Darryl Keener, Patty Richardson, Dr. Julie Hawley, Patti Watson, Kathy Baird

GASBURG ~ The Pleasant Hill Christian Church located at 175 Ankum Road in Gasburg, Virginia cordially invites you to celebrate God’s greatest Gift of His Son, Jesus Christ, with “A Festival of Christmas Music” on Sunday, December 3, at 7:00 pm.  The Christmas Celebration will feature songs for everyone!  From Silent Night to Beautiful Star of Bethlehem, this concert is sure to usher you into the Christmas season.

The festive evening of Christmas music will be presented by Patti Watson, Kathy Baird, Wendy Keener, Darryl Keener, Patty Richardson, Tammy Hand, Dr. Julie Baird Hawley, and the Pleasant Hill Christian Church Youth and Adult Choirs.  The concert will benefit children and families of domestic violence in Brunswick, Sussex and Greensville counties.

Patti Watson is a member of Philadelphia United Methodist Church while, Kathy Baird, Patty Richardson, Wendy Keener, Darryl Keener, Dr. Julie Hawley and Tammy Hand are members of Pleasant Hill Christian Church. Together they will present medleys of familiar Christmas carols as well as songs of the season. Following the concert, you are also invited to a reception that will be held in the PHCC Family Life Center.

There is no admission fee or ticket required for the concert, however, a special love offering will be collected during the program for the Family Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention Program which is a non-profit organization that is specially designed to help victims of domestic violence and/or sexual assault.  The Family Violence Sexual Assault Unit has been serving the citizens of the City of Emporia, Greensville, Sussex and Brunswick Counties for 29 years. The unit is available to assist victims 24 hours a day, seven days a week and is manned by a small group of staff and volunteers.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 2017 the Unit served 689 victims: 334 from Emporia, 185 from Greensville County, 128 from Brunswick County and 32 from Sussex County. 190 of the victims were under the age of 17, 97 were aged 18-24, 286 were aged 25-39, 100 were aged 40-59 and 16 were 60 and older. Helping people who are hurting and in need this Christmas season is what this event is all about. For more information regarding the concert please call the church office at (434) 577-2463.

Make Shopping Small Your Holiday Tradition

Locally-Owned Businesses Support Communities More than Large Chains

BY Acting SBA Regional Administrator Carl Knoblock

Saturday, November 25, 2017 is Small Business Saturday® – a day to celebrate and support small businesses for all they contribute to our local communities. Did you know that since 1995, small businesses generated 64 percent of new jobs, and paid 44 percent of the total United States private payroll? When we shop small –spending our money at locally-owned small businesses within our neighborhoods and towns – we help create two out of three net new local jobs.

Across the nation we are already seeing advertisements and news stories about which major chain is opening their doors on Black Friday, or even pushing employees to work on Thanksgiving Day! What you might not hear about, but should, are the mom and pop shops, the corner bakeries, and other locally-owned businesses that are competing with these national and international conglomerates. This holiday season, let’s recommit to keeping more of our hard-earned money local by supporting our neighborhood champions, America’s small businesses.

When you shop local, you’re putting your money right back into your town and neighborhood. Compared to chain stores, locally-owned businesses recycle a much larger share of their revenue back into the local economy, enriching the whole community, which means more money for local police and fire departments as well as schools and other community supported infrastructure and services. Do the math: Small businesses donate 250% more than larger businesses to non-profits and community causes. And, for every $100 you spend at a locally-owned business, roughly $68 stays in your local economy compared to only $43 from the big guys.

This Small Business Saturday®, visit your Main Street merchants to find unique, handmade gifts, and unsurpassed service that you won’t find at a big-box retailer. Afterward, dine at a locally-owned restaurant, an industry employing 14 million Americans and generating $709.2 billion in sales - equal to 4 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. Many small restaurants are also more eco-friendly by serving local products.

To continue the entrepreneurial spirit of small businesses, the U.S. Small Business Administration Richmond District Office will do a series of “Where Are We” articles. These articles will showcase small businesses throughout the state of Virginia. Please subscribe to the Richmond District Office Govdelivery to receive articles. Remember to shop and dine small on Saturday, November 25. And, while you’re out shopping, make sure to tell us about it on social media using #SmallBizSat and #ShopSmall to amplify your support. 

For more information on local Small Business Saturday events in your area, check out: www.sba.gov/saturday

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