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Greensville County Business, Professional and Occupational Licenses are now due. To avoid penalties, please secure your 2017 license from the Commissioner of the Revenue's Office by March 1, 2017.  The office is located at 1781 Greensville County Circle,  Room 132, Emporia, VA – Highway 301 North – Sussex Dr.  Our telephone number is 434-348-4227. 

Martha S. Swenson

Master Commissioner of the Revenue

Greensville County

 

ATTENTION TAXPAYERS

City of Emporia

2017 Business Personal Property Returns and 2017 Business and Professional Occupational Licenses (BPOL) are due to be filed with the Office of the Commissioner of the Revenue, 201 South Main Street no later than Tuesday, March 1st to avoid penalty.  The mailing address is Commissioner of the Revenue, P.O. Box 956, Emporia, VA 23847. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to call 434-634-5405.

                                                                                    Joyce E. Prince

                                                                                    Commissioner of the Revenue

A female, tri-colored hound dog. was found on US Highway 58 on Sunday, January 22, 2017.  She has a black back, brown face and white chest. Call 757-262-8694.

State building renamed for civil rights activist

By Megan Schiffres, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – A state government building that once served as headquarters of the “Massive Resistance” campaign against racial integration of Virginia’s public schools was renamed Thursday in honor of Barbara Johns, a student activist who played an important and often overlooked role in the civil rights movement.

Johns was only 16 when she led a student protest that would one day become part of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education.

Like most segregated schools at the time, the all-black high school Johns attended in Farmville, Virginia, was overcrowded, underfunded and dilapidated in comparison to the white schools in the Prince Edward County. On April 23, 1951, Johns persuaded all 450 of her classmates to stage a strike and march to City Hall in protest of the school’s substandard conditions.

“When she took a stand like that, it was a dangerous time, and I was the one who was worried about what might happen to us. She didn’t seem to have any fear at all,” said Barbara Johns’ sister, Joan Johns Cobb, who marched alongside her.

Johns enlisted the help of the NAACP, which filed a suit on behalf of 117 students against Prince Edward County, challenging Virginia’s laws requiring segregated schools.

“This was before Little Rock Nine, this was before Rosa Parks, this was before Martin Luther King. This was a 16-year-old girl who said that we will not tolerate separate but not equal,” said Gov. Terry McAuliffe, who announced in January that the newly renovated Ninth Street Office Building would be renamed in Johns’ honor.

Located at 202 N. Ninth St., the building was once known as the Hotel Richmond. During the 1950s, members of the General Assembly stayed at the hotel when they came to the capital for the legislative session. The building became the unofficial headquarters of the Byrd Organization, the dominant pro-segregation political machine at the time.

The attorney general at that point, James Lindsay Almond, originally defeated Johns’ case by claiming that segregation was a way of life for Virginians. Now the building, which houses the state attorney general’s office, has been christened the Barbara Johns Building. Current Attorney General Mark Herring said the renaming will serve as a reminder to him and his staff that the mistakes of the past cannot be repeated.

“She saw an injustice for exactly what it was, and she stood up for what was right. She demanded that which the constitution guaranteed her, and which the commonwealth denied her,” Herring said.

The case, Davis v. School Board of Prince Edward County, was appealed to the Supreme Court and combined with four similar segregation suits under Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. On May 17, 1954, the court ruled unanimously that racial segregation in public education was unconstitutional.

Powerful members of the General Assembly then met in the very building that now bears Johns’ name to plot against the desegregation of Virginia’s public schools.

Led by U.S. Sen. Harry Byrd and his political machine, the state engaged in a campaign of “Massive Resistance” against desegregation. This led to the shutdown of schools across Virginia when lawmakers decided they would rather see them close than integrate. It wasn’t until 1968, when the Supreme Court ruled their plan unlawful, that large-scale desegregation took place in Virginia.

On Tuesday, the House of Delegates joined the Senate in passing a resolution declaring April 23, the anniversary of the strike, as Barbara Johns Day in Virginia.

“The fact that the very General Assembly that passed laws to prevent school desegregation is naming a day for Barbara Johns is a really powerful testament to how far we’ve come,” said Dr. Larissa Smith Fergeson, professor of history at Longwood University. “In many ways, these are symbolic acts, but symbolic acts matter.”

Earl Jasper Carpenter

Mr. Earl Jasper Carpenter, 76, of Skippers, Virginia, died on Thursday, February 23, 2017, at Southside Virginia Regional Medical Center in Emporia, VA.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete and will be announced by the Roanoke Rapids location of H.D. Pope Funeral Home.

Condolences may be sent via:  www.hdpopefuneralhome.com

Jackson-Feild Improvements

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services recently completed several improvements in three separate locations on the campus.

Built in 1825, the historic manor home called “Walnut Grove” needed a new front porch due to deterioration in the original wood.  In addition, a wheel chair ramp was added to ensure that the facility is ADA-compliant.

Two houses originally built as residences for staff members were given a fresh coat of paint and new back decks, and new light fixtures in preparation for an on-campus program that JFBHS will launch in April. 

Rogers and Marshall Cottages also saw updates with new vinyl flooring to replace the old carpeting.   The bathrooms in the 1960s-built Rogers Cottage also received a facelift and remodeling.

This spring, JFBHS is looking fresher and brighter thanks to the work of Larry Pair and his maintenance staff.

The Improvement Association Addresses Childhood Obesity

Lydia Kearney, LPN, Health and Disability Specialist for The Improvement Association, teaches the children enrolled in the agency’s Head Start initiative various stretching techniques.

The Improvement Association has partnered with the Virginia Cooperative Extension Office to implement the Literacy, Eating, and Activity for Preschoolers (LEAP) health curriculum for the 2016-2017 school year. The LEAP curriculum is being offered to 262 children throughout Sussex, Surry, Brunswick, Dinwiddie, Greensville and Emporia. LEAP includes reading books focused on preparing and eating healthy foods and being physically active. Students have learned about planting and growing healthy fruits and vegetables, they’ve tasted various types of apples and carrots dipped in yogurt, and participated in physical activities such, as stretching, to keep their bones limber.

The LEAP curriculum was implemented in an effort to help curb the growing epidemic of childhood obesity. The Improvement Association’s Health Advisory Committee noticed that 16% of Head Start students were obese during program year 2015-2016. The implementation of the LEAP health curriculum encourages children to make healthy food choices and to include physical activity in their daily life.

Head Start is now recruiting for the 2017-2018 program year. For more information contact Shikee Franklin, Head Start Director, or Logan Tatum, Family Service Specialist, at 434-634-2490.

New law lets concession stands sell cans of beer

By Jessica Samuels, Capital New Service

RICHMOND – Beginning July 1, Virginians will be able to buy a can of beer – not just a cup – at indoor and outdoor concession stands that are licensed to sell alcoholic beverages.

That’s the effect of a bill that Gov. Terry McAuliffe signed into law on Monday. Senate Bill 1469 will add “single original metal cans” to the list of disposable containers that can be used for the sale of beer, wine and mixed alcoholic drinks.

The legislation, sponsored by Sen. Ben Chafin, R-Montgomery, will apply to concession stands at amphitheaters, stadiums, coliseums, convention centers and similar facilities, which currently must dispense alcoholic beverages in plastic or paper cups.

Under the new law, for example, racetrack events like NASCAR racing will be able to sell cans of beer.

Chafin’s measure is the same as HB 1744, which also received unanimous approval from the House and Senate. The House bill’s sponsor, Republican Del. Nick Rush of Montgomery County, called it a “common-sense” law.

“It allows the original metal container to be disposable,” he said.

The legislation is just one of several bills from the 2017 legislative session that may change the state’s alcoholic beverage control laws. Others include:

HB 2433, which would treat cider as wine for all legal purposes. The measure, sponsored by Del. David Bulova, D-Fairfax, has passed both houses and is on McAuliffe’s desk.

SB 1150, which would require the ABC Board to offer training to bartenders on how to recognize and intervene in “situations that may lead to sexual assault.” The bill, introduced by Sen. Barbara Favola, D-Arlington, received final approval from the Senate on Wednesday.

HB 2220, which would create a new limited mixed beverage license for retail cigar shops. The proposal, sponsored by Del. Steven Landes, R-Augusta, has passed the House and is awaiting a final vote in the Senate.

Governor signs bills to fight Virginia’s opioid crisis

By Mary Lee Clark, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Capping off a signature issue of the 2017 legislative session, Gov. Terry McAuliffe signed five bills Thursday to help arm the fight against opioid abuse and fatal overdoses in Virginia.

The bills address the crisis in various ways. They include SB 848and HB 1453, which allow community organizations to dispense and train individuals to use naloxone, a drug that can treat an opioid overdose in emergency situations.

“We recognize that addiction is a disease, not a moral failing,” McAuliffe said. “Our proposals for this General Assembly session focused on preventing addiction and providing treatment for those who suffer from it.”

The governor also signed HB 2165, which will mandate all opioid prescriptions be transmitted to pharmacies electronically by 2020. It will also create a workgroup to study how to best implement the change.

“The fight against the national opioid abuse epidemic gained more momentum today as Virginia became the most recent state to mandate that care providers use electronic prescribing for controlled substances,” said Dr. Sean Kelly, who is a practicing emergency physician and the chief medical officer of Imprivata, a health care information technology company.

Kelly said that electronic prescribing for controlled substances, or EPCS, helps the health care industry to reduce prescription fraud, drug diversion and drug abuse. Virginia is joining three other states – New York, Minnesota and Maine – in mandating EPCS.

“This is a real ‘all hands on deck’ moment,” said Attorney General Mark Herring. “The heroin and opioid crisis is touching families who never imagines they would confront something like this, and yet now are fighting something that feels so overwhelming.”

In November 2016, McAuliffe joined State Health Commissioner Marissa Levine in declaring the Virginia opioid addiction crisis to be a public health emergency.

Although final numbers are not available, the Virginia Department of Health projects that more than 1,000 people died in Virginia from fatal opioid overdoses in 2016. That would be a 33 percent increase from the previous year.

Here are more details on the bills McAuliffe signed into law:

SB 848, sponsored by Sen. Jennifer Wexton, D-Loudoun, and HB 1453, by Del. David LaRock, R-Loudoun, allow community organizations to possess and dispense naloxone to people whom the groups have trained to administer the life-saving drug.

HB 2317, by Del. John O’Bannon, R-Henrico, allows local health departments to administer harm reduction programs in parts of the state with high rates of HIV and hepatitis. These programs will exchange dirty syringes for clean ones, offer testing for hepatitis C and HIV, and connect people to addiction treatment.

HB 1786, by Del. Chris Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, initiates a family assessment and plan of care from local social services if a child is found to have been exposed to substances in utero. This connects the mother to treatment if necessary and provides services to ensure the safety of both the mother and the child.

HB 2165, by Del. Todd Pillion, R-Washington, mandates that all opioid prescriptions will be transmitted to pharmacies electronically by 2020 and creates a workgroup to study how to implement this policy.

State won’t study ‘fiscal stress’ of local governments

By Amy Lee, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – A bill ordering a study of the “fiscal stress” of local governments was halted in the House Rules Committee this week.

More than 53 percent of counties and cities in Virginia have reported above-average or high fiscal stress, according to a report by the Commission on Local Government. Petersburg, a city grappling with a severe financial crisis, placed third on the state fiscal stress index behind the cities of Emporia and Buena Vista.

“Petersburg does have some financial challenges, but they’re actually not unique. There are a lot of counties and localities within the commonwealth right now that are facing similar fiscal distressers,” said Del. Lashrecse Aird, D-Petersburg.

The top priority for this session, according to Aird, is identifying “what we as a commonwealth need to do to put protections into place and allow localities to have tools and resources to prevent this type of challenge from occurring into the future.”

Under SJ 278, a 15-member joint subcommittee would have reviewed local government and state tax systems, local responsibilities for delivery of state programs and causes of fiscal stress among local governments. In addition, the study would craft financial incentives and reforms to promote increased cooperation among Virginia’s regions.

“I believe that this legislation will help address fiscal issues that localities are experiencing,” said Sen. Rosalyn Dance, D-Petersburg, who co-sponsored the legislation. “Currently, there is no statutory authority for the Commission on Local Government to intervene in a fiscally stressed locality, and the state does not currently have any authority to assist a locality financially.”

In the case of Petersburg, the city received technical assistance from state officials, including cataloging liabilities and obligations, researching problems and reviewing city funds. However, state intervention could have occurred only if Petersburg invited it, because current law forbids the commonwealth from imposing reactive measures in a struggling locality.

SJ 278 was sponsored by Sen. Emmett Hanger, R-Augusta County, who co-chairs the Senate Finance Committee. Earlier in the session, the committee killed seven bills relating to state and local tax policy reform. Hanger agreed to reconsider the rejected tax reforms as part of the proposed study mandated by SJ 278.

Hanger’s resolution passed in the Senate but was left in the House Rules Committee. Del. Lee Ware, R-Powhatan, cited the upcoming elections this year of House members and governor as a roadblock for the bill. Moreover, the 2018 legislative session will last 60 days, compared with just 45 days during the current session.

“Regarding tax reform proposals, they are interesting to consider in a short session but unlikely,” said Ware, who chairs the House Finance Committee. He told the Richmond Times-Dispatch that he is drafting a broad tax reform proposal for next year’s session.

Assembly poised to OK state budget on Friday

By Amelia Heymann, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Finishing a day early, House and Senate negotiators agreed on a budget Wednesday that includes employee pay raises and more money for K-12 education and mental health.

The negotiators presented their budget to their fellow lawmakers in time for the required 48-hour review, which could be completed by Friday night with a chance to adjourn their 2017 session before Saturday’s target date.

Republican leaders in the House and Senate praised the spending plan’s conservative fiscal policies.

Sen. Emmett Hanger, R-Augusta County, co-chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, said, “This conference report responsibly addresses the challenges facing the commonwealth, prioritizes funding for our schools and public safety professionals, and is fiscally conservative.”

The budget was approved early for the third consecutive year, which is a stark contrast to the U.S. Congress, which has been notoriously slow at approving federal spending plans.

“While Washington drowns in debts and is mired in gridlock, the Republican-led General Assembly has produced a conservative budget ahead of schedule for the third time in a row,” said Del. Steven Landes, R-Augusta County, vice chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.

“We continue to chart a prudent fiscal course for Virginia. The investments in education, health care and public safety will improve the lives of our citizens and make Virginia a better place to live, work and raise a family.”

The new budget allocates $83.1 million for a 3 percent pay raise for state employees and college faculty, in contrast to Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s budget proposal for a one-time, 1.5 percent bonus to employees. The budget also sets aside funds to implement House Speaker William Howell’s Commission on State Employee Retirement Security and Pension Reform.

This means $200,000 will be set aside for the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission to complete a total compensation study of all state employees, and $140,000 for state agencies to incorporate succession planning and re-hiring in their strategic plans.

This year’s agreed-upon budget exceeds the governor’s investment in K-12 education by approximately $18 million, as well as investing $15 billion for direct aid to public education.

Before the 2010 budget, 35 percent of lottery proceeds were given to local schools. This year’s budget re-establishes that practice, and lottery proceeds will send $191.3 million back to localities to help with public education.

The budget also helps higher education by reducing the governor’s cuts by $20 million. This is part of the General Assembly’s continued effort to make higher education more affordable. The budget will also restore full funding to the Virginia Tech Extension Service, as well as the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. In addition, there will be no reductions in funding to Norfolk State University and Virginia State University.

In the health sector, the conference budget invests $32.2 million to build a stronger healthcare safety net, including funding for substance abuse treatment. It also increases eligibility for the Governor's Access Plan, which is a program that helps provide behavioral health forVirginia's uninsured adults.

The conference budget does not include the Affordable Care Act’s expansion of Medicaid, which might not end up having much of an impact anyway if the Trump administration’s proposal to replace Medicaid with federal block grants to each state is adopted.

The budget also restores the Stanley amendment, which doesn’t let the governor expand Medicaid without approval from the General Assembly.

The conference budget was created to decrease general-fund spending by 5 percent over 10 years when adjusted for population and inflation.

KAINE MEETS POPE FRANCIS IN VATICAN CITY, DISCUSSES GLOBAL REFUGEE AND MIGRANT CRISIS

VATICAN CITY – Today, U.S. Senator Tim Kaine attended a general audience with Pope Francis in Vatican City and spoke with the Pope about the Holy See’s work to address the global refugee and migrant crisis. A photo of the meeting is attached and included below.

“I had a chance to visit with Pope Francis to discuss the global crisis of refugees and migrants which is relevant around the world and to my work in the Senate,” Kaine said. “As the Pope stated so clearly yesterday, it is a 'moral imperative' to protect and defend the 'inalienable rights' of refugees and respect their dignity, especially by adopting just laws that protect those fleeing dangerous or inhumane situations.”

“The bilateral relationship between the U.S. and the Holy See is tremendously important and the work we are doing together to address issues such as refugees, human trafficking, conflict resolution and reconciliation helps us advance peace in the world, as we try to end suffering and cooperate on issues of common good,” Kaine continued.

In Vatican City today, Kaine also met with the Foreign Minister of the Holy See Archbishop Paul Gallagher, participated in a discussion focused on Latin American issues with Vatican officials, and met with the Jesuit Refugee Service to discuss its work with refugees and asylum seekers. 

Photo taken by Paul Haring of Catholic News Service:

Local Nonprofit Hosts Dinner and Auction at New Restaurant in Petersburg Historic Landmark

Petersburg, February 21, 2017-- Crater Community Hospice is thrilled to be hosting its spring dinner and auction at a recently revitalized building in Petersburg's Old Town. On Sunday March 12, attendees will gather at the Farmers Market Restaurant at 9 E. Old Street.

The distinctive Farmers Market building is a unique architectural example in Petersburg. As early as 1787 a city market was located on the site, with a sequence of public buildings built there over the past two centuries. Robert Bolling entrusted the land to the town in 1806 for permanent use as the market. 1879 marked the completion of the current building. The National Register of Historic Places added the landmark to its roles in 1969.

Attendees at "Welcome Spring!" will gather at 5pm to enjoy music and a gourmet dinner designed by executive chef Frits Huntjens. An auction will offer unique opportunities while raising funds to serve patients and their families and public educational programs. Optima Health and Eastern VA Bank (EVB) are among the local corporate and private sponsors.

E. Jane Elliott, Chair of the Crater Community Hospice Board of Directors, is thrilled to present this event. "We are excited to gather members of our community for a memorable evening. We have assembled several packages including art, wine, and a vacation to Virginia Beach through generous donations and local support. Attendees will enjoy this modern restaurant that honors the historic landmark that houses it, while raising critical support for Crater Community Hospice, a local nonprofit serving families throughout our community."

Limited tickets are still available for this exciting evening. A $75 per person contribution is in part tax-deductible. For tickets, contact CCH Development Director Deborah Williamson at (804) 526-4300 or visit the website at www.cratercommunityhospice.org

STUDENT OF THE MONTH JOSEPH LEWIS CARRICK FEBRUARY 2017

Brunswick Academy is pleased to announce that Joseph Lewis Carrick has been chosen the February 2017 Student of the Month.  Joseph, a senior, is the grandson of Ron and Dot Moore of Bracey.  During high school, Joseph has been a member of the Latin and Spanish Clubs, participated with the Brunswick Academy Theatre Tech Crew and this year is the Senior Trip Treasurer.

Joseph works each Saturday at the R. T. Arnold Library in South Hill.  He also volunteers at the Library’s summer reading program each year. 

Joseph enjoys reading and is very passionate about history, especially British history!  His future plans include attending either James Madison University or Roanoke College.  He plans to major in Biology or Business.    

CONGRATULATONS JOSEPH!

Civil Rights/Discrimination Complaint Process

As a participant or applicant for programs or activities operated or sponsored by USDA you have a right to be treated fairly. If you believe you have been discriminated against because of your race, color, national origin, gender, age, religion, disability, or marital or familial status, you may file a discrimination complaint. The complaint should be filed with the USDA Office of Civil Rights within 180 days of the date you became aware of the alleged discrimination. To file a complaint of discrimination write to USDA,

Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326W, Whitten Building, 14th and Independence Avenue, SW, Washington DC 20250-9410 or call 202-720-5964 (voice or TDD), USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.A complaint must be filed within 180 calendar days from the date the complainant knew, or should have known, of the alleged discrimination.

Nursing Staff Initiates Innovative Method to Calm Alzheimer’s Patients

Mellisa Black, Acute Care Nursing Director; Betsy Tuck, RN Preceptor; and Linda Norman, RN, Assistant Director of Medical-Surgical Telemetry are pictured with dolls, music players, and hand knitted “twiddle muffs” which are all being used to help calm and comfort dementia and Alzheimer’s patients at VCU Health CMH in South Hill.

South Hill – When patients that are affected by dementia and/or Alzheimer’s disease are hospitalized, it can be a very confusing and depressing time for them.  In an effort to help calm and comfort these patients, the nursing staff at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital decided to try an innovative method called “Doll Therapy.”

The goal of using therapy dolls is to give dementia and Alzheimer’s patients a diversion activity which in turn helps reduce anxiety, nervousness, falls and increases cooperation with the nursing staff.

As stated from the Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging, “According to several studies, men and women in the middle to later stages of Alzheimer’s disease found that therapy dolls provided comfort and companionship.  These adults with Alzheimer’s received the benefits of sensory stimulation and purposeful activity from the dolls.  Their behavior improved, including a reduction in aggression and agitation.” (Resources:  Nursing Times and Carefect, Inc.)

Also noted from the Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging was that humans have a natural instinct to nurture, give love and receive love.  This natural instinct doesn’t go away, even as memories deteriorate with dementia. 

Betsy Tuck, RN Preceptor, said, “As the Unit Chair for the Medical-Surgical floor of our Nursing Shared Governance group we discuss ways to improve care for our patients.  In discussion about ways to improve care for dementia and Alzheimer’s patients, the initiative of a diversional/nurturing activity (Doll Therapy) was started.  Our goal is to keep patients from falling from bed, pulling out therapy lines and/or sustain other injuries.  So far, the results have been very positive.”

Linda Norman, RN, Assistant Director of Medical-Surgical Telemetry, said, “Patients that are in some stage of dementia, when taken out of their normal environment will be distressed and sometimes uncooperative.  So, when they receive a doll it calms them and gives them comfort and companionship.  By calming the patient, the plan of care can be completed in a manner that is beneficial to the patient and staff.”

Tuck also added that the nursing staff is planning to try music therapy in the future with patients.  The plan is to play music that the patients like or just soothing music to induce a calming effect in the room.  Also in the plan for a diversional activity is giving patients “twiddle muffs” (knitted muffs with interesting bits attached) which are made for patients that pick or pull; the patient will be occupied pulling at the twiddle muff instead of pulling out their IV.

Tuck stated, “We will continue to think of innovative ways to care for our patients because one day we may be a patient under those same circumstances and want the best care possible for ourselves or our family members.”

C3’s Kid’s Meals Accepting Summer Meals Program Applications

Franklin, VA - Cover 3 Foundation is gearing up for their 7th summer as a sponsor of the USDA Summer Feeding Service Program. Application deadline for C3’s Kid’s meals is March 17, 2017. Through sponsorship of the USDA Summer Feeding Service Program, C3’s Kid’s Meals provides free, healthy and balanced breakfasts, lunches, snacks and suppers to all children attending a qualifying site within 90 miles of Franklin, VA. Qualifying sites may include day care centers, recreation centers, churches, schools, summer camps, open park sites, and community centers. Acceptance and participation requirements for the  program and all activities are the same for all regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability, and there will be no discrimination in the same course of the meal service. All returning sites and new sites must complete the preliminary online application found at http://www.cover3foundation.org/c3-s-kid-s-meals-application.html no later than March 17. If you want to partner with C3’s Kid’s Meals to provide healthy and balanced meals to children at your center and have questions, please contact Cover 3 Foundation at 757-562-2252 or email info@cover3foundation.org.

CMH Community Hospice’s Open House Set for March 9th

South Hill—CMH Community Hospice, a service of VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital, will be hosting an “Open House” event on Thursday, March 9th from 11:00AM - 3:00PM at the Thomas W. Leggett Center located at 300 East Ferrell Street in South Hill. 

The public is welcome to visit the new Hospice office inside the Leggett Center, have questions answered and find out more about this unique community treasure.

Refreshments will be provided as well as information on Hospice care and services.  Come meet the staff and talk with Hospice volunteers.

This event is FREE and open to the public.  There is a lot more to Hospice care than you may think, so come find out why Hospice is preferred by patients and their families.

For more information call (434) 774-2457.

Starting Feburary 15, 2017, No Open Burning Before 4 pm

To help reduce the number of wildfires this time of year, the Commonwealth’s 4 p.m. Burning Law goes into effect February 15. The law prohibits open burning between the hours of midnight and 4 p.m. each day. Burning is permitted between the hours of 4 p.m. and midnight, but officials at the Virginia Department of Forestry caution people that, even though burning is allowed from 4 p.m. to midnight, they not burn if the weather conditions are such that a fire will likely escape. (Such conditions include low humidity, warm temperatures and winds over 10 miles per hour.) The law remains in effect each year until April 30.

“The 4 p.m. Burning Law is one of the most important tools we have in the prevention of wildfires in Virginia,” said John Miller, VDOF’s director of fire and emergency response. “The number one cause of wildfires in the Commonwealth is people burning yard debris and/or trash, and the 4 p.m. law goes a long way toward reducing the risk associated with wildfires each year.”

A violation of the 4 p.m. Burning Law is a Class 3 misdemeanor punishable by up to a $500 fine. In addition to the criminal violation, however, those who allow a fire to escape are liable for the cost of suppressing the fire as well as any damage caused to others’ property.

Meherrin Regional Library Invites You To Snuggle With a Book

The Meherrin Regional Library System will begin its Snuggle with a Book! Winter Reading Program on Monday, February 6, 2017.  The winter reading program is for young children, from birth through first grade.  During the next month, the library will have story times on Tuesdays at 11:15 at the Richardson Memorial Library, Emporia and 10:30 on Thursdays at the Brunswick County Library, Lawrenceville.  Participants can win a prize for returning their reading logs in March.

To learn more about the winter reading program please call the Brunswick County Library at (434) 848-2418 ext. 301 or the Richardson Memorial Library at (434) 634-2539 or visit www.meherrinlib.org.

Gifted Students Invited to Apply for Meherrin Summer Regional Governor's School

The 2017 Meherrin Summer Regional Governor’s School sponsored by the Virginia Department of Education for identified gifted students in the General Intellectual Aptitude area in current grades 4-7 will be held at the Greensville County High School on July 10-13 and 17-20, 2017.  Participating counties include Greensville, Mecklenburg, Brunswick, Southampton, and Sussex.  For more information, contact the local gifted education coordinator.  Application Deadline – February 17, 2017

HALIFAX STREET (ROUTE 610) BRIDGE REPLACEMENT PROJECT BEGINS

Construction underway

EMPORIA– A project to demolish, remove and replace the existing Halifax Street Bridge on Route 610 is under construction. Contract crews for the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) will demolish then replace the bridge and rebuild the approach roadway to tie into the new bridge. The new bridge will be 36 feet long and 32 feet wide. All construction work is dependent upon weather conditions. 

Halifax Street (Route 610/3807) is closed to thru traffic in both the northbound and southbound directions. Motorists are advised to follow the signed detours in place. 

S.T. Wooten Corporation was awarded the $660,000 contract for the new bridge replacement on November 8, 2016. The project will continue over the next 5 months, with completion scheduled for June 2017.

Businesses and homeowners will always have access at all times. To learn more, please visit http://www.virginiadot.org/projects/hamptonroads/halifax_st_bridge.asp.

Motorists are encouraged to visit www.va511.org, call 511, listen to Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) 1680 AM or call the Traffic Information Line at 757-361-3016 for current traffic and travel information. 

Library wants Yearbooks

The Meherrin Regional Library System is seeking donations of local school yearbooks to include in a yearbook digitization project. Working with the Library of Virginia, MRLS is looking to the public to donate yearbooks especially from the years 1977 and before. Local public and private schools of Brunswick and Greensville counties may be included in the project. Donations are needed before October 26th and may be dropped off at the Brunswick County Library, Lawrenceville or the Richardson Memorial Library, Emporia. The books will be used for digitization and then added to the library’s permanent reference collection. For more information or questions call 434-848-2418 ext. 301 or 434-634-2539.

VDOT URGES MOTORISTS TO OBEY ROUTE 301 BRIDGE TRAFFIC AND DETOUR SIGNS

Virginia State Police to begin enforcement for reckless driving.

GREENSVILLE COUNTY – Safety is the biggest priority for the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT), and the Hampton Roads District is urging motorists to obey all traffic and detour signs posted around the Route 301 Southbound Bridge Replacement Project in Greensville County.  Recently, drivers have been observed traveling the wrong way over the Route 301 Northbound Bridge to avoid the construction detour, resulting in several near-collisions.

Beginning today, January 4, 2016, Virginia State Police will step up enforcement near the bridge and issue reckless driving citations to motorists exhibiting dangerous driving patterns.  Drivers traveling southbound will use I-95 as the detour around the bridge closure.

The Route 301 Bridge Replacement Project is currently on schedule for completion in summer 2017.  The old bridge has been demolished, and crews are currently working on building the new bridge approaches.   For more information, please visit VDOT’s project website:

http://www.virginiadot.org/projects/hamptonroads/rte_301_bridge.asp

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Stories on Emporianews.com are be searchable, using the box above. All new stories will be tagged with the date (format YYYY-M-D or 2013-1-1) and the names of persons, places, institutions, etc. mentioned in the article. This database feature will make it easier for those people wishing to find and re-read an article.  For anyone wishing to view previous day's pages, you may click on the "Previous Day's Pages" link in the menu at the top of the page, or search by date (YYYY-M-D format) using the box above.

Comment Policy:  When an article or poll is open for comments feel free to leave one.  Please remember to be respectful when you comment (no foul or hateful language, no racial slurs, etc) and keep our comments safe for work and children. .Comments are moderated and comments that contain explicit or hateful words will be deleted.  IP addresses are tracked for comments. 

EmporiaNews.com serves Emporia and Greensville County, Virginia and the surrounding area
and is provided as a community service by the Advertisers and Sponsors.
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Submit Your Story!

Emporia News welcomes your submissions!  You may submit articles, announcements, school or sports information using the submission forms found here, or via e-mail on news@emporianews.com.  Currently, photos and advertisements will still be accepted only via e-mail, but if you have photos to go along with your submission, you will receive instructions via e-mail. If you have events to be listed on the Community Calendar, submit them here.

Contact us at news@emporianews.com
 
EmporiaNews.com is hosted as a community Service by Telpage.  Visit their website at www.telpage.net or call (434)634-5100 (NOTICE: Telpage cannot help you with questions about Emporia New nor does Teplage have any input the content of Emporia News.  Please use the e-mail address above if you have any questions, comments or concerns about the content on Emporia News.)